ZenBlog: Blog http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog en-us (C) ZenBlog (ZenBlog) Fri, 19 Dec 2014 08:27:00 GMT Fri, 19 Dec 2014 08:27:00 GMT Friday Foto Favorites 12.19 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/friday-foto-favorites-12-19    

1.     Photos that prove the world is truly majestic.

2.     Turn your iPhone photos into art seamlessly.

3.     What chairs would look like if they were people.

4.     Here’s the breakdown on the five new Instagram filters.

5.     Some of the 2014 National Geographic Photography contest winners

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/friday-foto-favorites-12-19 Fri, 19 Dec 2014 17:01:00 GMT
Just in Time for Christmas Print Sale http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/just-in-time-for-christmas-print-sale

There’s still time to get something for everyone on your list, and we’ll sweeten the deal with a 40% discount. Today and tomorrow only, all prints from Mpix and MpixPro are on sale.

All print orders placed and approved by tomorrow, December 18, and shipped via FedEx Next Day will arrive in time for Christmas. So don’t delay, place your orders today.

As always, no coupon code is necessary when you order through your Zenfolio account. When choosing a shipping method, select FedEx Next Day at checkout. Some oversized products will require FedEx 2Day shipping. Please note that FedEx does not deliver to PO boxes.

For a complete list of shipping deadlines, check out our Holiday Shipping Deadlines blog post. Be sure to place your orders today!

 

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

•   This sale will be effective from 17-Dec-2014 at 12:01 a.m. PST until 18-Dec-2014 at 11:59 p.m. PST only and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.

•   This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.

•   The following vendors are participating in the promotion: Mpix and MpixPro.

•   For photographers placing orders from Edit View the promotion requires no coupon code.

•   The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.

•   This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  

•  Please read our Sales FAQ and blog on running a sale on your site.

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(ZenBlog) Christmas Mpix MpixPro Zenfolio gifts photography prints sale http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/just-in-time-for-christmas-print-sale Wed, 17 Dec 2014 08:01:00 GMT
Behind the Shot http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/behind-the-shot A picture is worth a thousand words, sure. But have you ever wondered what was reeling in the minds of the photographer as soon as they released the shutter? We asked several photographers to share their personal favorite shots and the stories behind them. From pulling all-nighters to capture the best lighting to traveling the corners of the globe to touching life tales of their subjects, here’s proof that there’s much more to a photo than simply pointing and shooting. Here, three seasoned photographers recount what it took to get that perfect shot.

Flamingos in Lake Nakuru by Bala Murali

“The 24th of February in 2011 became an unforgettable day in my life. I live in Nairobi, the capital city of Kenya. On the 24th, I went to Nakuru for a business meeting. Nakuru is about 140 km from Nairobi, and it has a beautiful bird sanctuary called Lake Nakuru National Park. Lake Nakuru is situated right inside the park, which is a home for thousands and sometime millions of flamingos. 

Usually I travel with my camera wherever I go, whether it is an official tour or a personal one. Therefore, I decided to visit the park for bird shooting as soon as I finished my meeting. I entered the park around 2 p.m., and was looking like a good location to park my car and shoot the flamingos and white pelicans.

All of the sudden, I saw lot of smoke spreading throughout the park. It took me a few minutes to realize that there was a wild fire in the park, and the smoke was spreading fast. For a moment, I thought of leaving the park to get to a safer place. Then, while looking around I happened to see hundreds of flamingos and white pelicans trapped in the park amidst the fast spreading smoke. From their movement I could feel that they did not realize what was happening and they just got confused and started gathering at one spot. I immediately dropped my plan of escaping and started shooting them with the smoke in the background.”


Cape Town Mama by Tracey Hill

“I took this photo in Cape Town, South Africa. It's not perfectly composed, and the camera was not perfectly set up, but I love it and have a large metal print of it in my studio. Here is how it happened.

While on holiday in Cape Town I saw this lady walk by and grabbed my camera and ran after her, but she refused to have her photo taken as everyone always asks her to pose. I begged and pleaded, eventually explaining I was born in South Africa myself and she would remind me of home. Local street traders who I had brought goods from earlier started helping and begging her. She suddenly said, ‘you get one click, quick!’ and this was my one click.”

 

Aldershot Memorial by Andy Taylor

“While I was still as serving soldier I was taking a City and Guilds course in photography as part of my resettlement back into civilian life. It was raining, and as I drove back I noticed how fantastic the sky looked behind this memorial and Normandy Barracks (closed down by then) in the background. I could even see my old office.

I had a limited angle to take this from as to one side there was a parked van and the other was an open trench for the water main repairs. Behind me was a busy road (at rush hour, of course). The weather was changing, so I had to take this quickly before I lost the drama in the sky. I used on-camera flash to fill in the details on the memorial.

In the end this photo got me my first digital wedding shoot as the bride and groom met in Aldershot in the barracks behind the memorial. The memorial reads:

In memory of 

Leut Reginald Archibald Cammell

Air Battalion Royal Engineers

Who lost his life

while flying an aeroplane at

Hendon

on the 17th September 1911

This Obelisk was erected by his

brother officers 

in recognition of his services to military aviation

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(ZenBlog) Andy Taylor Bala Murali Behind the Shot Tracey Hill Zenfolio behind the scenes cityscape photography galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio portrait photography professional professional photographer professional photography selling wildlife photography http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/behind-the-shot Mon, 15 Dec 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 12.12 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/friday-foto-favorites-12-12

1.     Here are some of the runners for the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards.

2.     Swirling paint photography is candy-colored and beautiful.

3.     14 important things this photographer learned throughout her career.

4.     How to take stellar Christmas tree photos.

5.     Photography is not an art, claims this writer. 

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/friday-foto-favorites-12-12 Fri, 12 Dec 2014 21:26:14 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 12.5 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/friday-foto-favorites-12-5

1.     How photography has gotten so much better just in two years.

2.     At artful illustration at what grief looks like.

3.     Wrestling isn’t just for young men. Here’s to breaking stereotypes.

4.     What breakfast looks like all over the world.

5.     LEDs in long exposure prove to be quite beautiful. 

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/friday-foto-favorites-12-5 Fri, 12 Dec 2014 18:20:16 GMT
Photographer's Corner: Filing Your Income Taxes http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/photographers-corner-filing-your-income-taxes

We can whine and moan all we want, but income taxes aren’t going to disappear. Here, you will find out everything you need to know as a small business owner, so you can feel confident that you are filing your US income taxes correctly.

 

1.  What is a sole proprietor?

A sole proprietor is the owner of a business who is exclusively entitled to keep all profits and exclusively liable for all losses from the business. Most freelance photographers are automatically sole proprietors. Sole proprietor just means that you have not legally filed your business as a corporation or other entity type. Your profits are taxed on your personal tax return; you do not need to file a separate tax return for your business. As a sole proprietor, you are responsible for withholding and paying income taxes and self-employment taxes, which is normally something an employer would do for you.

2.  If I’m a part-time photographer, how can I file my taxes?

Unless you have created a separate legal entity for your photography business, you will report your photography income and expenses on Schedule C. The Schedule C is filed along with your individual income tax return (Form 1040) and calculates your profit or loss from a business. If your business is an LLC, corporation or other business entity, a tax return separate from your personal tax return would need to be filed. You may want to consult your tax professional for more information about your specific filing requirements.

3.  How can I get organized before filing my taxes?

It is important to keep accurate records for your business. One good approach to make filing your taxes easier is to keep a business bank account and/or credit card that is separate from your personal finances. If you do this, it will be easier to compute your business expenses when tax time comes. In addition, it is important to keep your receipts with details of your business purchases. On your tax return Schedule C, you will need to break your business expenses from the year into categories like advertising, travel, supplies, etc.

4.  Do I need to worry about self-employment tax?

If your net earnings from self-employment are $400 or more during the 2014 year, you are required to pay self-employment tax. Net earnings is your total income from the business less all business-related expenses (including taxes paid). Self-employment taxes are contributions to Social Security and Medicare system. A normal employee makes these contributions as deductions from their paychecks, and sole proprietors must make these contributions when paying their taxes.

5.  When tax time approaches, what are the most important things to consider?

There are a number of common deductible business expenses that many sole proprietors may forget. For instance, if you use your personal car for your business, you can deduct some of the costs. The most common way to do this is to keep a log of all business-related car travel. The IRS puts out a standard mileage rate to figure the deductible costs of operating your car for business purposes. Note that the usual cost of travel from home to your office or studio is not deductible.

In addition, any fees you pay to consultants, lawyers or tax professionals relating to your business are deductible. If you use credit to finance business purchases, all fees and interest paid are tax-deductible. If you take a current or prospective customer out for a meal or entertainment, 50% of the cost is deductible if it is directly related to the business and business is discussed at the event. If a customer fails to pay for goods sold to them, you may deduct the cost of the goods as a bad debt deduction.

6.  What write-offs or deductions should I include? 

On your tax return you will report the costs of doing business against your income from the business. The amount you are left with is your gross income, and this is what you are taxed on. In order to keep as much money in your pocket as possible, you want to deduct all allowable business expenses. According to the IRS, you may deduct business expenses that are ‘ordinary and necessary.’ While the IRS has not fully defined what is ordinary and necessary, it is generally easy to determine if an expense is deductible. For instance, a purely personal trip to Hawaii should not be claimed as a business expense. However, the costs of operating your business, product and advertising costs, and some of the cost of business-related meals are deductible.

7.  Should I hire an accountant come tax time?

Depending on the complexity of your business and the amount of effort you want to spend on filing your taxes, you may want to hire an accountant to help you. If you stay organized and keep your business separate from your personal finances, filing taxes doesn’t always have to be time-consuming or stressful. Consulting a tax professional could be a valuable resource for your business to help with financial planning and tax requirements.

8.  What else do I need to know about filing taxes as a freelancer?

If you make a profit as a freelancer, you may be required to pay estimated quarterly taxes. Since you don’t have an employer who is withholding income taxes from each paycheck, it is important to understand your tax liability. As a sole proprietor, if you expect to owe $1,000 or more in taxes for the current year, you may be required to make tax payments throughout the year.

 

Disclosure: This post is for information purposes only. Zenfolio encourages you to consult your tax professional for specific tax issues regarding your business.

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(ZenBlog) Zenfolio freelance income taxes photographer photography professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/photographers-corner-filing-your-income-taxes Tue, 09 Dec 2014 18:22:51 GMT
Photographers Under 25: Snapping Their Way to Stardom http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/photographers-under-25-snapping-their-way-to-stardom

The beauty of going into a creative profession such as photography is that you don’t have to go to four plus years of school or take several exams and spend tens of thousands of dollars in order to claim that title—you can start at any age. We spoke with three young, thriving photographers—some full-time and some part-time—who were lucky enough to find their passion and talent at a young age.

Rosie Hardy, 24

How did you get your start in photography?

It was always a hobby for me; a little vanity in wanting to have a nice profile picture, a little curiosity as to why the girls in the magazines looked so perfect and I didn’t. At 16 I just wanted to mess around with my face and my brother gave me his Linux computer complete with GIMP installed, and mess around I did!

When I graduated from sixth form, I didn’t want the other kids to think I was weird or odd, so I started offering to take pictures of other friends and students, both at events and out of school. Everyone was so supportive, and encouraged me to continue with my self-portraits, which were now in the “conceptual” realm of editing/manipulation. It all snowballed from there.

What do you shoot? Who are your main clients?

Portraits, essentially, but I dabble in everything. I’m not in the position to turn my nose up at any kind of work/type of photography. But my favourite work so far is my personal work—emotive conceptual portraits that tell a story.

I shoot all kinds of folk—from as far and wide as wedding portraits for friends free of charge to shooting the likes of Maroon 5, Geri Halliwell and Donny Osmond. I’ve been incredibly lucky to get some of the jobs I’ve had, and make a point of making sure I never forget that I’m just a mix of trial, error and luck. I don’t want to rely on contacts to help me improve and get my work exposure.

Is being a young photographer easy? What are the obstacles?

I’m very lucky to say I’ve been supporting myself for the last four years with photography alone. Being a young photographer is much easier than starting in the industry when you’re older. People are a lot more forgiving of your technical mistakes when you are young, they’re also willing to support you in your dreams and help you get there. You can also take advantage of living with your parents whilst you build up a client base. If you’re older, you have to quit your job to devote yourself entirely, and if you have rent/bills/children, that’s a scary prospect.

 

What inspires you?

The older I get, the more I’m inspired by my own feelings and thoughts, locations, music, film and art. I didn’t really have a point of view to convey when I was first creating art—I just knew I wanted to convey SOMETHING, and all I had was teenage angst. The more mature I get, the more I learn about the world, and the more my vision becomes clear and the easier it is to put a message to my photos.

Describe a typical day.

I’ll start at midnight. I reply to emails to Zenfolio at 00.24 a.m. The TV is in the background, and the cat is cute and sleepy. At 2 a.m. I’ll play some music, ponder life, find a good documentary to watch. At 4 a.m. I lie awake in bed with my mind bouncing all over the place like a tiny rubber ball trapped in a small box. Sleepily unfold the meaning of life, make lists on ways to change my life. At 5 a.m. I fall asleep. At 8 a.m. the cat slaps my face until I wake up and fill up his food bowl. Then I go back to sleep. At 10 a.m. I wake up, shower, do emails, check social media and get lunch. At 2 p.m. I start editing my workload for the day, upload a favourite shot to social media, and continue to 8 p.m. I feel unproductive with the day and swear to myself that I will get up earlier. I attempt to work more, realize I haven’t left the flat all day, and make lists on how to chance said routine. At 12 a.m., repeat.

I shoot maybe twice a week, three/four times in heavy periods of work. It’s very easy to let it all get on top of you. Working from home is great in terms of getting up when you please, but it’s very hard in other aspects—I’d love to leave my flat more often.

 

Eleanor Bennett, 18

How did you get your start?

I was very involved with learning and conserving the environment as a child. I was once making a nature notebook for a children’s competition and that involved taking photos or the choice of drawing what you see. Nothing much came about that small competition, but I enjoyed taking photos so much I decided to continue and began taking images of everything that interested me.

Who are your main clients?

Greatly it is in the publishing industry. When I was young I mainly sold interior art to magazines, and now my most regular clients are the publishing houses I work with doing book cover art. I’m in the process of looking to network with interior designers and gallerists.

Is it hard balancing school with a photo business? How do you do it all?

I’m actually thinking of spending more time on my education as of recent. Whilst I’m working, I’m considering doing a couple of home business courses. I assisted in running (mainly finding and researching) an Etsy shop for two years until November of this year. I handle everything by just taking as much as possible one day at a time so at least one important thing gets done a day to reach my next milestone.

 

Do you handle all aspects of your business?

When it comes to the shop I had a lot of parental help. I had my photography as a business model prior to that though, which means when I was 14 I had to manage my own invoices, royalties, contracts and what I allowed the people purchasing from me in regards to rights. At that time it was on such a small scale that the money was a help to me as a photographer but not something to survive on. I got a lot of hands-on experience in dealing with the publishing industry without the debt of university. It was really valuable to learn what I have done.

 

What is your best-selling product?

The self-portrait of me hiding under leaves has been used on everything from calendars to wall art in libraries. It is a simple but effective way of conveying the love of the wild that children hold close to their hearts.

 

What or who inspires you?

Everything. I like to make the weird into fine art and the dull into splendour. I like to change opinions and minds. The need to be fresh and eye-catching with the combination of wonder and confusion in my audience does wonders to keep me taking photos.

 

Gabriella Corrado, 18

How did you get your start?

I first started photographing out of boredom. I was about 12 or so when I got a little point-and-shoot camera, and whenever I needed to be by myself, I would take it outside with me. I took pictures of flowers and leaves and tried to sell them online, but they weren’t very good—actually quite embarrassing. Then, during my sophomore year of high school, I found Flickr and realized that photographs could be art. Inspired, I attempted a 365 project and started getting my friends to model for me. From there, I just never stopped.

What inspires you?

This is always a difficult question for me because inspiration can come to me from everything or nothing at all. My daily life influences me a lot, as well as nature. I am drawn to places with history and like to create stories around them.

At the top of my long list of inspirational photographers are Tim Walker, Rodney Smith, Brooke Shaden, and Kristy Mitchell. Their work is fairly different from each other, but they make me want to create.

What is your best seller?

It’s called “Young and the Restless.” I took it in 2012 when I was first starting to take portraits, and it blew up on Flickr. It was featured on digital-photography-school.com and used on a poetry magazine cover.

Describe a typical day.

Lately my life has been: school, sleep, eat and repeat. In a few weeks though I get a nice long break from classes, and I am going to use it wisely.

 

Is it hard balancing school and photography?

The advantage of starting young is that you have time to really develop, learn and build up a portfolio. Also, people are often impressed with those who have experience and talent at a young age. On the other hand, the industry sometimes views young photographers as amateurs and do not take us seriously. This can make it harder to get paid fairly because clients do not want to pay as much money for young “novice” photographers. In the end, I think it’s an advantage because starting out young gives you more years.

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(ZenBlog) Eleanor Bennett Gabriella Corrado Rosie Hardy Zenfolio photo photographer photography portfolio professional photography selling young photographers http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/photographers-under-25-snapping-their-way-to-stardom Tue, 02 Dec 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Cyber Monday Mystery Sale—One Day Only! http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/cyber-monday-mystery-sale-one-day-only

In celebration of the year’s biggest online shopping day, we decided to make things a bit more interesting. Welcome to our Cyber Monday Mystery Sale, where you will save anywhere from 25-50% on new subscriptions, add-ons, upgrades (if applicable), prints and products for ONE DAY ONLY.

Here is what you need to know:

Log in and check your Edit View to see what discount you get, and how to redeem it. The discount applies to upgrades (if applicable), add-ons, prints and products.

The discount applies to new subscriptions, add-ons, prints and products.

Hesitant to sign up? Rest assured, because every account comes with a 30-day satisfaction guarantee. If you are not completely happy in 30 days of your sign up, you get your money back in full.

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

  • This sale is taking place for one day only, 1-Dec-2014 from 12:01 a.m. PST until 11:59 p.m. PST and cannot be extended outside of this time frame.
  • This discount applies to one order only.
  • This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.
  • The following vendors are participating in the sale: MpixPro, Mpix, PhotoBox, One Vision Imaging, IYP, Triple Scoop Music, ivoke, Nulab, NuShots, ProImageEditors and BorrowLenses. The discount does not apply to renewals, fotoflot, PictureItPostage or Miller’s.
  • The discount is applicable on all prints and products, upgrades (if applicable), add-ons and new subscriptions.
  • For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.
  • The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.
  • The discount is not applied to shipping charges.
  • This sale cannot be passed on to clients. 
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(ZenBlog) Cyber Monday Zenfolio photographer photography professional photography sale http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/12/cyber-monday-mystery-sale-one-day-only Mon, 01 Dec 2014 08:45:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 11.28 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-28

1.     This Canadian photographer proves age ain’t nothing but a number.

2.     Actions speak louder than words in this poignant photo shoot.

3.     In a celebration of food, this mom wakes up early to make it an art.

4.     Is Iceland really on planet Earth?

5.     How famous artists would arrange their Thanksgiving meals. 

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-28 Fri, 28 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Product Spotlight: Video in Photoshop http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/product-spotlight-video-in-photoshop

Review by Shelley Paulson

 

I’ve been a professional photographer now for more than 10 years, but in 2014, I made the decision to branch out and make short, DSLR films, specifically focused in the equine industry (an area of specialty with my photography). I thought that because I could use my photography cameras for video, how hard could it be? Well, I’ve learned that the answer is, actually, it’s quite hard.

Video and filmmaking is a completely different beast than photography. I needed to invest in thousands of dollars of gear, learn how to set up my cameras differently, work within the technical limits of the gear, and… don’t even get me started on audio. Getting great sound has been one of the biggest challenges of them all.

For my first few films, I dove into learning Adobe Premiere Pro CC. I was mildly familiar with the process of video editing. In a past career, part of my job was video creation. I was relieved to find out that video editing software has matured and is much easier to use now. However, I have found myself wishing for my photo editing standbys of Lightroom and Photoshop when it comes to color grading, which is a fancy video term for color correction, my footage.

When I was asked to look at “Video in Photoshop” from Photoshop Cafe, I had mixed feelings. Part of me was excited about the possibility of being able to color grade in Photoshop. But a bigger part of me was quite skeptical about Photoshop being robust enough to do serious video editing.

It turns out both my optimism and skepticism were right.

To be fair, Colin Smith, the host of this series, does say at the start that this is geared for photographers and designers, not professional videographers. And I would agree with that. If I had never used Premiere, and was making only basic videos and slideshows, this would be a great place to start.

Part 1: Editing Video

In the beginning of the Editing Video section, Colin does a great job of covering the basics of capturing video, using anything from an iPhone to DSLR. He discusses the basics of gear, as well as exposure and the need for filtering. Frame rates and shutter speeds are covered, without becoming too technical or dry.

From there, he walks step-by-step through how to set up a Photoshop workspace for motion, bring in clips, rearrange them on the timeline, work with audio, and set up transitions. All the clips needed to follow along are included on the DVD, and the pace was easy to follow. A few times I would have to pause or rewind a few seconds because I lost track, got distracted, or couldn’t see where his mouse was pointed. The interface for watching the videos made this very easy, though at times I wished for more resolution in the video, so I could see where that mouse was pointing!

My favorite part of this section was when he showed how to create motion graphics. I had no idea that I would be able to create graphics, set them in motion, and then export for use in another video program, like Premiere. I’m likely to try this because Photoshop is a comfortable graphic environment for me, whereas After Effects is a little beyond my skill level right now.

Part 2: Slideshows

I wasn’t expecting to find a great tutorial on how to create custom slideshows! The tools found in Photoshop are easy to use. You can set the duration and pan/zoom motion of each slide individually, and add a music track to bring it all together.

Part 3: Additional Skills

Just when I thought the tutorial was winding down, Colin brought in a piece of footage from his quadcopter that was pretty flat in appearance. What he did next BLEW MY MIND.

He opened it up in a Camera Raw filter.

I literally said, “No way!” several times until my husband came to my office to see what I was freaking out about.

To have a photography-like interface for color grading my footage at my fingertips changes everything. I have struggled with the tools native to Premiere, don’t have the time to learn After Effects, and haven’t wanted to invest in a third-party color grading software until I have the basics down. And now I find out I had the best tool all along!

It’s not a perfect solution, because I will have to leave Premiere to color correct, which will add another step for me. However, this capability alone will make it more likely I will do some simple video editing in Photoshop and skip Premiere altogether.

Colin also demonstrated how to fix lens distortion for super wide lenses like you find on a GoPro and also how to import a time lapse, which was very easy.

Putting It to the Test

The day after watching this tutorial, I went out to a friend’s farm and filmed her horses running through a fresh snowfall. I used 60 frames per second, with the intention to bring the footage into a 24 fps timeline and achieve slow motion. It wasn’t until after I went out and filmed that I realized I should have checked to make sure Photoshop could do that. Thankfully, it has this capability, and I spent a few hours choosing footage, editing clips, color grading and putting it all to music.

Having watched the video, I had the basics down, but one very basic thing Colin didn’t cover was how to cut a clip. He showed how to make a clip shorter by dragging either end, but sometimes I want to take several pieces out of the same clip. I was able to find the answer by Googling.

I would position Photoshop somewhere between iMovie and Premiere. Photoshop brings in more control on a lot of levels, so I think even a hobbyist video producer would enjoy using Photoshop for editing video.

The tutorial itself was easy to follow, and Colin Smith does a great job of giving you a lot of information while keeping it interesting. I would highly recommend this video tutorial for anyone just getting started editing video or making custom slideshows.

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(ZenBlog) Photoshop Cafe Shelley Paulson Video in Photoshop photography professional photographer video http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/product-spotlight-video-in-photoshop Mon, 24 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 11.21 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-21

1.     Newspapers without photos seem to lose their luster.

2.     Is this what the George Lucas museum will look like?

3.     A fine line between life and death can be very beautiful.

4.     Cats and humans—they’re not so different.

5.     This series takes a look at the lives of soldiers outside of the military. 

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-21 Fri, 21 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Behind the Shot http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/behind-the-shot A picture is worth a thousand words, sure. But have you ever wondered what was reeling in the minds of the photographer as soon as they released the shutter? We asked several photographers to share their personal favorite shots and the stories behind them. From pulling all-nighters to capture the best lighting to traveling the corners of the globe to touching life tales of their subjects, here’s proof that there’s much more to a photo than simply pointing and shooting. Here, three seasoned photographers recount what it took to get that perfect shot.

Sauti by Peter Stanley

“Sauti za Busara, the Zanzibar music festival, takes place every February and is a celebration of African music and culture. I live a short ferry ride away in Dar es Salaam and have been coming to this festival for the past six years. I used to squeeze through the crowds with my DSLR and try to capture the event as best I could just as a personal photography challenge.

In 2011, I sent some of my images to the festival organizers with the hope of volunteering in the coming year. I was welcomed to the team, and when I arrived I felt like a fish out of water. Making pictures is where I find my footing and feel most comfortable, yet here I was in a room of photographers and journalists looking over schedules and shot lists and deadlines for uploading. It was all new to me and intimidating to say the least.

The event is four days long, and each day I went out to make the best pictures I could and then spent hours after the show ended, usually from 1-4 a.m., editing and uploading to our distribution site. I put a huge amount of time into it because I loved the feeling of supporting this wonderful event with my images, and in the end I made some pictures that really made me feel like my photography had been lifted to the next level.

When I arrived to shoot Sauti za Busara 2013, the director of photography did not hand me a shot list; instead he simply said, “We really like your stuff from last year, so get out there, shoot as many acts a you can, and have fun.” That gave me a lot of energy, but it also meant shooting from the afternoon (relaxed traditional music) through the last act (local hip hop). As you can imagine, the light, the mood, and the crowd changed dramatically from bright afternoon sunshine with families picnicking to intense stage lights and smoke machines with a packed house creating dust with their dance.

The experience really stretched my photographic knowledge, and I was glad that before this event I had reviewed as many blogs and podcasts as possible to learn tips/tricks on concert photography. Also, having invested in new camera gear (D800 and Nikkor 50mm f1.4) made a big difference in my ability to deal with very low light at times.”


Love Life by Kevin Mullins

“Although I’m a wedding photographer by trade, I shoot a lot of street photography and social documentary photography for my own personal work, and I was recently approached to shoot a Caesarean birth here in the UK. A lot of hoops had to be jumped through in terms of getting permission from the midwives and the surgeons involved. The mother is a professional photographer herself and had been attracted to my reportage style approach to photography. The shoot involved me spending the whole day of the birth with mum and dad (and daughter) before and after the procedure. I had chosen to use a Fuji X100S for the shoot, as it is silent, discreet and very small. It was the perfect companion, and when the little one popped out I was thrilled and humbled (and a bit teary) to be there to take the very first photograph. It’s a touching moment, of course, and one that mum and dad have told me they will now be able to cherish, through the medium of photography, forever.”

 

Royal Portrait by John Baikie

“This commercial shoot was one of the most highly pressurised, rewarding and shortest I have ever done. I have covered many events with the royal family in Scotland but was never been allowed a one to one with Prince Charles, the future king. I had to do a promotional shot of the chairman of the Castle Trust handing over the first copy of a book to his royal highness. I had then arranged to take a shot of the royal guest with the castle (his late grandmother’s holiday home for many years and a place he visited as a child) in the background. I got just three frames and this was my favourite. Thank goodness he never blinked in any of them! It was a great experience and he chatted with me for a short time. He is a great guy and does a lot for my home county.”

 

 

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(ZenBlog) Behind the Shot John Baikie Kevin Mullins Peter Stanley Zenfolio behind the scenes event photography galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio portrait photography professional professional photographer professional photography selling wedding photography http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/behind-the-shot Mon, 17 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 11.14 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-14

1.     Nine-year-old crowned Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

2.     These photos will give you an adrenaline boost.

3.     These shots are all perfectly timed.

4.     Photographer + aspiring model daughter equals pure genius. 

5.     These art-laden metro stations will have yours beat.

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-14 Fri, 14 Nov 2014 17:01:00 GMT
Photographer’s Corner: The Art of Fine Art Photography http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/photographer-s-corner-the-art-of-fine-art-photography

Although there are many photography genres out there, there seems to be a distinctive line between client and non-client work. With the majority of photographers shooting portraits, weddings and family photos, it seems non-client work, such as landscape and fine art photography, is a not as widely discussed. We talked to three fine art photographers who sell their work on Art.com, among other outlets, about the business of their photography.

                 

 “I started out as a news photographer shooting car wrecks, house fires and high school basketball games for my hometown newspaper,” explains Paul Souders of Worldfoto. “I was consumed with dreams of journalistic glory. But in reality, the assignments were pretty prosaic.” That’s when, after 10 years of working for his local newspaper, Souders decided to leave his journalism career to start capturing things that he felt were more meaningful: wildlife and landscapes.  

 “Small-town journalism is supposed to be about telling the story of your community. I kind of feel like that’s what I still do, but wilderness areas around the world are my community, and it’s those stories I want to show,” he says.

“I’m nearly as happy shooting modern cityscapes in China as I am chasing polar bears in the arctic.” As a full-time photographer, Souders makes his living working with two of the largest stock agencies out there, Corbis Images and Getty Images. He then uses that money toward new trips and projects to feed his passion.

“The photos can wind up nearly anywhere, from a two-page spread in National Geographic to a billboard in Mozambique to an advertisement for Mexican condoms.”

                 

As fas as advertising his work, Souders admits he’s not big on social media:

“It’s hard to stay in touch from onboard a small boat in the arctic ice pack or on a safari in some remote corner of Botswana. Hard to imagine, but there are still places on the earth where you’re free from the burdens of social media.” So, he relies on entering competitions and on his agencies to share his work. That’s how Aneta Ivanova got her start, by participating in contests in her home country of Bulgaria, and abroad—but this 22-year-old, unlike Souders, also relies on social media to market her work.

“[Fine art] gave me the freedom to visualize what I was seeing in my head, and most importantly, it didn’t limit me in any way like some types of photography do.” Her best selling products? The ones she puts the most time and effort in. “The style is usually double exposure.” Ivanova sells her work on platforms such as Art.com and Society6, and she also sells usage rights to some of her images. And unlike Souders, photography is not her full-time job.

“I chose [fine art photography] because I can create whatever I want when I want without worrying if the piece I’m working will sell or not. I chose to continue doing photography while having a primary job from which my income comes.”

In fact, photographer Evan Morris Cohen admits to doing no marketing whatsoever for his photography.

“If people find me I’m sure they were meaning to click on someone else and found me by accident,” he jokes. The fine art photographer, whose best-selling photos are of architecture featuring empty streets of New York City and the Brooklyn Bridge, says that photography chose him.

“For years I drifted in and out of photography. Some years back I started collecting and shooting vintage cameras, and I drifted back into photography—and I’ve stayed ever since.” Customers love his vintage-looking photos, which are aimed to look like they were taken years ago.

“It’s what happens when you shoot with 50- or 60-year-old film. You never know how it’s going to come out, or if it will even come out at all.”

So whether full- or part-time, these photographers all have one thing in common: they have a passion for creating their own images out in the wild, without relying on the confines of client work.

“I don’t shoot with a client in mind; I shoot the images that capture my imagination,” says Souders.

 

To view more of their work, visit Art.com.

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(ZenBlog) Zenfolio fine art marketing photographer photography professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/photographer-s-corner-the-art-of-fine-art-photography Mon, 10 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Save 30% on High-Quality Prints http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/save-30-on-high-quality-prints

Show off your hard work by turning your photos into professional quality prints from Mpix, MpixPro, One Vision Imaging, PhotoBox, Nulab and NuShots, and save 30% through November 12.

As always, no coupon code is necessary when you order through your Zenfolio account. This sale ends November 12 at 11:59 p.m. PST, so be sure to place your orders today.

 

 

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

•   This sale will be effective from November 10, 2014 at 12:01 a.m. PST until November 12 at 11:59 p.m. PST only and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.

•   This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.

•   The following vendors are participating in the promotion: Mpix, MpixPro, One Vision Imaging, PhotoBox, Nulab and NuShots.

•   For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.

•   The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.

•   This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  

•    Please read our Sales FAQ and blog on running a sale on your site.

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(ZenBlog) Imaging Mpix MpixPro NuShots Nulab One PhotoBox Vision Zenfolio discount marketing photographer photography prints professional photographer professional photography promotion sale selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/save-30-on-high-quality-prints Sun, 09 Nov 2014 13:01:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 11.7 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-7

1.     Behold, the first photo of a human being.

2.     Does this owl have a thing against photographers?

3.     What NYC’s Chinatown looked like in the ‘80s.

4.     Crafty daughter puts herself in her mother’s childhood photos.

5.     Holding onto summer as long as possible: here are beautiful firefly trails.

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-7 Fri, 07 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Day in the Life of a Zenfolio Engineer http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/day-in-the-life-of-a-zenfolio-engineer

Unlike many of the others here at Zenfolio, you’ve never spoken with or seen me, but I’ve been here behind the scenes taking care of you. It’s not that I’m hiding, but as an engineer that’s where I work best. I’m Stephen Daugherty, and I’m a Senior Software Developer at Zenfolio and kind of a nerd—in a good way of course!

Clearly I don’t have enough cameras

I have to admit that I absolutely love programming. Growing up I knew exactly what kind of career I wanted to have before leaving elementary school. Working at Zenfolio is less a job for me and more of an avenue to exercise that passion. Projects vary from systems work, to issues trouble shooting, to developing new features and more. Whatever the task, it’s always a unique challenge for all of us on the team.

It’s easier to code with cute things around you

I’ve earned a reputation around the office as a bit of a diet soda fiend. I probably go through two liters every day and then some. Luckily, Zenfolio provides drinks in the office. There’s some friendly ribbing involved, but it’s all in good fun. Besides, everyone knows better than to get between me and my soda!

Must drink diet soda…

Outside of the office my main hobby is working on an anime and comics convention with my wife called Kraken Con. What is it? Well think of something along the lines of San Diego Comic-Con but smaller and including Japanese animation as a focus. We’ve been doing it for around a year now, and it’s already grown to almost 3,000 attendees! Check out some photos from the conventions at photos.krakencon.com, and if you find yourself in the SF Bay Area in April or October we’d love it if you joined us!

The costume contest at Kraken Con

I’ve been at Zenfolio for more than two years now, and I can’t imagine working anywhere else. Everyone works together to deliver the best experience for our customers, and we all support each other. Sometimes the hours get long for the developers, but it’s worth it to deliver for all our Zennies—and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

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(ZenBlog) Stephen Daugherty Zenfolio code photographer programming http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/day-in-the-life-of-a-zenfolio-engineer Wed, 05 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Q&A with the 2014 Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/q-a-with-the-2014-pink-lady-food-photographer-of-the-year

Zenfolio is delighted to be a partner of the Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year, the world’s leading food award celebrating the art and diversity of food photography. Tessa Bunney of the UK and Lao PDR was announced as Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year 2014 earlier this year for her image “Noodle Making” from her series “Home Work.” The series explored “craft” villages in the suburbs and villages in and around Hanoi, Vietnam. We asked Tessa all about her photography.

1. How did you get started in photography?

I can’t remember a time when I didn’t take photographs. When I was a child with a Kodak Instamatic on family holidays and as a teenager I would explore the village and the surrounding areas where I lived in Somerset on my bike taking pictures in the countryside and the nearby seaside in Weston-super-Mare. After I left school I did a photography foundation course at Filton Technical College in Bristol, followed by a degree in photography at West Surrey College of Art and Design in Farnham.

2. Tell us about your photography business

I am a British freelance documentary photographer, but at the moment I am currently based in Vientiane, Lao PDR, where I am working on my long-term project ‘The Corridor of Opportunity,’ which is funded by Arts Council England and undertaking editorial work and commissions for NGOs throughout the Southeast Asia region. I focus on photographing farmers and small food producers, but I’ve also recently become interested in textiles. 

3. What got you interested in food photography?

I became interested in food photography through my interest in different landscapes and the way they are shaped by human activity. In the UK I am based in the North York Moors and spent many years working with small food producers and hill farmers around where I live, documenting their lives, work and connection with the landscape. Since then I have collaborated with Icelandic puffin hunters, Romanian nomadic shepherds and Sami reindeer herders in Finland. Currently I am interested in the changes taking place as Laos moves from a subsistence economy to a market-driven one and the consequences for the subsistence farmers in remote mountainous regions.

4. Tell us the story of your winning photo 

The photograph is of a noodle maker in Huu Tu village from the series ‘Home Work’ which explores ‘craft’ villages in the suburbs and villages in and around Hanoi, Vietnam. These specialise in a single product or activity, anything from palm leaf hats to incense sticks, or from noodle making to snake catching. Some of these ‘craft’ villages date back hundreds of years; while others are a more recent response to enable rural farmers to earn much needed extra income. ‘Home Work’ looks at the lives of women homeworkers, urbanisation and the consequences of industrial development in villages such as Huu Tu.

5. What is the no. 1 piece of advice you could give to food photographers?

If you are genuinely interested in the subject you are photographing and you are willing to spend time, to wait for the light and the right moment—that will be reflected in your images. I happened to be living in Vietnam at the time, but there are interesting and exciting food-related things happening on everyone’s street corner and in everyone’s home.

6. What else do you shoot?

Photographing farmers and small food producers is one my major preoccupations; however, I am also interested in textiles and have been working on a story about hemp production in remote Hmong ethnic minority villages in Laos, which will published editorially next year. In Laos I have also worked on a series about a women’s UXO clearance team working for the Mines Advisory Group, ‘The Women of UCT6,’ which was published in Financial Times Magazine.

In recent years I have also worked on several swimming-related series—Finnish ice swimmers, tidal pools in the southwest of England and the Serpentine Swimming Club in London.

7. How has the win changed your business?

It was a very welcoming confidence boost to encourage me to keep on going with my long-term projects and to tell the stories of small food producers and farmers around the world. It has been wonderful seeing the coverage of the Noodle picture across the world reproduced so many times.

8. What is your favorite part about food photography?

Aside from the actual photography, which I love, the best part is having the opportunity to meet food producers who are passionate about their way of life and their products, and of course being able to sample their food is a major perk of the job! Ian Spink's Arbroath smokies were possibly the best thing I ever tasted, and that was while working on an assignment for Gourmet magazine in Scotland.

Do you have what it takes to be next year’s winner? Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year is now open for entries and closes on Sunday, 8 February 2015.

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(ZenBlog) Pink Lady Food Photographer of the Year 2014 Noodle Making Pink Lady food photography photographer http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/q-a-with-the-2014-pink-lady-food-photographer-of-the-year Mon, 03 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Get a Jump on the Holidays: Save 20% on Holiday Cards http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/get-a-jump-on-the-holidays-save-20-on-holiday-cards

Get a head start on the holidays, and save some money at the same time. Starting November 3, save 20% on all holiday cards from Mpix, MpixPro, and One Vision Imaging.

Your loved ones are sure to be impressed with these personalized, high-quality cards. Take advantage of this sale and cross holiday cards off your seasonal to-do list.

As always, no coupon code is necessary when you order through your Zenfolio account. This sale ends November 6 at 11:59 p.m. PST, so be sure to place your order today.

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

•   This sale will be effective from November 3, 2014 at 12:01 a.m. PST until November 6, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. PST only and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.

•   This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.

•   The following vendors are participating in the promotion: Mpix, MpixPro, and One Vision Imaging.

•   For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.

•   The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.

•   This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  

•  Please read our Sales FAQ and blog on running a sale on your site.

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(ZenBlog) Zenfolio christmas cards galleries holiday cards marketing photographer photography portfolio professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/get-a-jump-on-the-holidays-save-20-on-holiday-cards Mon, 03 Nov 2014 01:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 10.31 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/friday-foto-favorites-10-31  

1.     Seven things you wish you learned in photo school.

2.     A celebration of color, and much more.

3.     “Found” photos from National Geographic.

4.     Just in time for Halloween, here’s some ghostly photo tips.

5.     A whole new perspective of the world through Thomas Prior

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/friday-foto-favorites-10-31 Fri, 31 Oct 2014 16:00:00 GMT