ZenBlog: Blog http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog en-us (C) ZenBlog (ZenBlog) Thu, 31 Jul 2014 16:49:00 GMT Thu, 31 Jul 2014 16:49:00 GMT Refresh Your Living Room—25% off Canvas Wraps http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/refresh-your-living-room-25-off-canvas-wraps Come home to a refreshed living room and save 25% on canvas wraps, July 31 through August 6 at 11:59 p.m. PDT.

As always, no coupon code is necessary to get the discount. Start shopping—this sale ends August 6!

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

  • This sale will be effective from 07/31/2014 at 12:01 a.m. PDT until 08/06/2014 at 11:59 p.m. PDT and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.
  • This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.
  • The discount is applicable on canvas wraps only.
  • For photographers placing orders from edit view, the promotion requires no coupon code.
  • The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.
  • This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  
  • If you are looking to pass this sale on to your clients, please read our Sales FAQ.
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(ZenBlog) Mpix NuShots Nulab OVI One Vision Imaging Photobox Zenfolio coupon discount galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio printing professional professional photographer professional photography promotion sale selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/refresh-your-living-room-25-off-canvas-wraps Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:33:45 GMT
Product Spotlight: Manfrotto 190XPRO3 Tripod Kit with 3-Way Head http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/product-spotlight-manfrotto-190xpro3-tripod-kit-with-3-way-head

 

As a commercial photographer, I shoot a lot of product and food images. Often I am asked to work with only available light, so the use of a tripod is essential. I always bring my trusty Manfrotto tripod to every one of these shoots. I have been using an older Manfrotto tripod for almost 10 years now, and it has never failed me. So when I got the opportunity to try the new Manfrotto 190XPRO3 tripod kit, I jumped at the chance.

The first thing I noticed was how much lighter the 190XPRO3 is. I do a lot of shooting on location, so a lighter load to haul around is worth a lot to me. In terms of setting up and adjusting the legs and levers, I was happy to find that the construction is very similar to my older tripod. This allowed me to easily adjust as needed while looking through the viewfinder because everything was located where I remembered it to be.

I am lucky to live on the coast of California, and my first instinct when trying the new 190XPRO3 kit was to take it to the ocean and attempt some long exposure shots. I got up well before dawn and headed to the shoreline to get set up. It was still relatively dark when I arrived, so I was very glad to have the familiarity of working with Manfrotto tripods in the past. I had an assistant on hand to hold a flashlight, but I didn’t really end up needing this, as the setup was quick and easy.

The surface I was shooting on was uneven rock, so I was glad to have the built-in level to make sure my horizon line wouldn’t be skewed. I used a cable release to make sure that I didn’t have any camera shake, and I covered the viewfinder with my hand during each exposure to make sure I didn’t have any light leaking in that way.

I tried a few different exposures to get the effect I wanted with the water blurring as waved rushed over the rocks. The morning I headed out we had a lot of morning fog rolling in, so I went for a somewhat gloomy and ethereal look with the horizon fading into the sky. The shots you see below were captured with a one-second exposure at f22. I was using my 70-200mm lens to zoom in to the water as the tide was all the way out and far from the shore at this time of day.

When I first received the kit I was thrilled to see that it included a horizontal mechanism, which my older tripod does not have. I was dying to try that out, so my next step was to set up a couple of overhead still life shots. It took me a few minutes to figure out how to switch the center column to the horizontal position (I stubbornly don’t like reading instruction guides), but once I figured it out it was a cinch to switch back and forth.

I really liked using the center column as a horizontal arm since it gives a lot more freedom with composition. In the past I have used a C-stand to set up shots like this, and the 190XPRO3 was infinitely faster and easier to get into position. The shots below were done with natural light and a wider aperture. I wanted the jewelry to be in sharp focus with the background slightly out of focus. Using a piece of glass to support the jewelry, I experimented with different surfaces and objects in the background until I got the look I wanted. The photo below of the gold and copper bracelets was shot at f4, and the shots with the flowers and gunmetal bracelet were done at f1.8. For both shots I used an 85mm lens.  

The last test I did was really just for fun. It has been a while since I played with shooting objects in motion, and I was inspired to create some fresh and playful food images. I am always building my stock portfolio, and this time of year there are a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables available to experiment with.

I set up a small fish tank with a black background behind it. I filled three-fourths of the fish tank with water and set up the camera on the 190XPRO3 to be level with the tank, just below the waterline. From there I tossed my colorful subjects into the water and did my best to fire the camera and lights at the right moment. After a few frames I realized that I needed help and talked a friend into assisting me with tossing the fruit. For images like this, capturing the subject at just the right moment takes a lot of trial and error, and it was much easier with an assistant. It is worth noting that with water splashing around I positioned the camera a ways back from the fish tank and used a 70-200mm lens.

All in all I was very impressed with the Manfrotto 190XPRO3 tripod kit and will definitely be using it on a regular basis. Like my older tripod from Manfrotto, I know that this piece of gear will last and be at my side for many years to come.

Laura Tillinghast started making art at a young age, discovering photography as her true passion in college. From that point on she has never put her camera down. Shooting primarily advertising and editorial content, you never know what you will find in front of her lens. Also an educator, Laura teaches a series of popular photo workshops that focus on the fundamentals of lighting. Check out her online portfolio here: http://lauratillinghast.com/

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(ZenBlog) 190 aluminium 3-section tripod 3-way head Bogen Laura Tillinghast Manfrotto Product Spotlight Zenfolio galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling tripod tripod kit http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/product-spotlight-manfrotto-190xpro3-tripod-kit-with-3-way-head Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Save 25% on All MpixPro Prints http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/save-25-on-all-mpixpro-prints

Starting today, save 25% on all MpixPro prints, from wallets to wide prints, and everything in between. Turn your images into high-quality prints that you can frame or give to loved ones.

As always, no coupon code is necessary when you order with your Zenfolio account. But hurry, this sale ends July 30 at 11:59 p.m. PDT, so be sure to place your orders today.

 

 

Not a Zenfolio user yet?

 

 

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

  • This sale will be effective from 7/26/2014 2:30 p.m. PDT until 7/30/2014 11:59 p.m. PDT and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.
  • This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.
  • The discount is only applicable on MpixPro prints.
  • The discount is only applicable to orders with destination addresses in the United States and Canada.
  • For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.
  • The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.
  • This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  
  • If you are looking to pass this sale on to your clients, please read our Sales FAQ.
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(ZenBlog) MpixPro Zenfolio coupon discount galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio printing prints professional professional photographer professional photography promotion sale save 25% selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/save-25-on-all-mpixpro-prints Sat, 26 Jul 2014 21:05:48 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 7.25 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/friday-foto-favorites-7-25 Each week, we scour the web to find the most off-kilter photos, gear and articles so you don’t have to. Happy reading and have an even happier weekend.

  1. What India looks like from a drone.
  2. How to get out of a creative rut.
  3. Nanny by trade, photographer underground.
  4. A discussion on how cameras alter your photography.
  5. A master class in space photography.
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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/friday-foto-favorites-7-25 Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Behind the Shot http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/behind-the-shot A picture is worth a thousand words, sure. But have you ever wondered what was reeling in the minds of the photographer as soon as they released the shutter? We asked several photographers to share their personal favorite shots and the stories behind them. From pulling all-nighters to capture the best lighting to traveling the corners of the globe to touching life tales of their subjects, here’s proof that there’s much more to a photo than simply pointing and shooting. Here, three seasoned photographers recount what it took to get that perfect shot.

Dubai by Peter Stanley

“Anyone who has flown through Dubai knows that the layovers can be pretty bad. On this trip, I was presented with a seven hour, evening layover. Not enough time to get out of the airport and see the city and not enough time to get any real sleep at the terminal. Since I wasn’t confined to a schedule (I’m a teacher and this was summer break), I asked my travel agent for the worst layover possible. As it turned out, I managed to get a 30-hour layover, which would be just enough time for a visit to a few sites.

I live in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and wanted to experience something different so I booked myself into the tallest hotel within my budget and asked for a room as high as possible. It was all quite random, but I find that my senses are ignited when I see things for the first time. These are the moments that I enjoy experimenting with my camera as I try to put all of those sensory experiences into one image. This picture was from the roof of my hotel. The roof was closed and very dark, which made for a wonderful place to set up a few long exposures as the hot desert air moved through the narrow line of skyscrapers.

This picture inspired me to set up a gallery on my website called ‘travel icons,’ which has created a fun personal challenge for me to try to make unique pictures when visiting those very well known places. I can’t wait for my next terrible layover so I can try to add another image to this gallery.”

 

Emerging Glory by Dan Ballard

“Banff National Park is one of the most incredible places on earth. I was hiking in the backcountry looking for locations. When I came over this pass midday I knew it was the area I wanted to shoot. I still had a couple more hours to the nearest possible camping area, however, and as it was all downhill I started groaning right then. Of course I couldn’t have picked an area to shoot that was a little closer to my tent! Now, if I had known at the time that I would have had this kind of incredible light the next morning, light that only happens a couple times a year at best, I wouldn’t have cared. Getting up at 2:30 a.m. and hiking for hours with this knowledge would have been great. However, at the time I thought it was almost certain that the light would not be great, and there was a very high chance that the clouds would block the sun altogether and I wouldn’t get a sunrise at all. That’s the hard thing about outdoor photography. You never know if you will have great light or nothing, and when you have to hike for hours to find out, it can be tough. With those thoughts in my mind, I woke up the next morning to rain hitting the tent. So I had to make a decision. Make myself crawl out of my warm, comfortable tent in the rain, to walk miles uphill in the dark, in the rain to almost definitely not even take my camera out… or roll over and go back to bed. That is not an easy decision to make on a cold, rainy morning at 2:30 a.m. let me tell you. Luckily, I somehow made it happen and made the hike. What I found when the sun came up was absolutely breathtaking. This is why I am a photographer. This is why I love it. This is why I always go. Even in the rain that I love so much, because I know that it can be followed be the most amazing light on earth, and often is.”

 

Stuck in Ice by Andrew Peacock

“This image was published on the front page of The Guardian Newspaper in the UK and the Sydney Morning Herald in Australia after I filed it from Antarctica just before New Years Eve 2013. I was aboard the Akademik Shokalskiy, a Russian vessel carrying scientists and tourists that became stuck in ice off East Antarctica and was at the center of a media frenzy.

It was not preconceived in any way, yet upon reflection later it's apparent to me that its genesis lay in what I had seen of photos from expeditions to Antarctica many years ago. Photographer Herbert Ponting was among the pioneers of classic Antarctic photography, and he captured the enduring black and white photo you see here of the ship Terra Nova, on glass plates, during Scott’s expedition of 1910–12. 

I had photographed just about every subject and angle I could think of in the week or so that we were stranded among thick pack ice, and as a member of the expedition team it was with little enthusiasm that I headed onto the ice again tasked with the job of keeping the two Guardian journalists who were also on board safe as they filmed a piece. For some strange reason I took only a fisheye lens with me, which didn’t really make sense if you consider we were surrounded by a huge open expanse of sky and ice as far as the eye could see. 

As fate would have it there was just one large ice feature—the passengers had named it The Blob—near the ship. While the guys recorded endless takes I wandered over to it and noticed at its base that there was a small gap where beautiful little icicles had formed in a blue cavern. I thought it might just be possible with the fisheye to create a composition where I could capture them with the ship in the distance. I was able to place the camera into a small icy gap but not physically position myself to see through the viewfinder or even see the LCD screen. So I began to experiment and fired off some shots and reviewed them on the screen to see what I had come up with. In fact, the composition came together quite easily, and all I needed to do was be patient in the cold waiting for the others to finish up so I could then direct them into position to complete the image that I now had in my mind. I was excited to see the final frames on my computer back in the cozy warmth of my cabin, but at the time I had no idea it would be a photo seen by so many newspaper readers around the world.

It felt a bit like I'd made something out of nothing, but clearly it's possible to make interesting images with almost any configuration of subject, environment and one lens of any focal length.

 

 

 

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(ZenBlog) Andrew Peacock Behind the Shot Dan Ballard Peter Stanley Zenfolio behind the scenes galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/behind-the-shot Mon, 21 Jul 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Half off 4x6 Print Sale –– 3 days only http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/half-off-4x6-print-sale-3-days-only Starting today, save 50% on all 4x6 Mpix prints. Stock up on this popular size today to display in your office, bedroom or living room (or give away as gifts!)

Not a Zenfolio user yet? You can still take advantage of this special offer.

This three-day sale ends this Wednesday, July 23 at 11:59 p.m. PDT, so be sure to place your orders today.

As always, no coupon code is necessary when you order through your Zenfolio account.

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

  • This sale will be effective from 7/21/2014 at 12:01 a.m. PDT until 7/23/2014 at 11:59 p.m. PDT and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.
  • This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.
  • This discount is only applicable to Mpix prints sized 4x6.
  • The discount is only applicable to orders with destination addresses in the United States and Canada.
  • For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.
  • The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.
  • This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.
  • If you are looking to pass this sale on to your clients, please read our Sales F.A.Q.
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(ZenBlog) Mpix Zenfolio coupon discount galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio printing prints professional professional photographer professional photography promotion sale selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/half-off-4x6-print-sale-3-days-only Mon, 21 Jul 2014 07:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 7.18 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/friday-foto-favorites-7-18 Each week, we scour the web to find the most off-kilter photos, gear and articles so you don’t have to. Happy reading and have an even happier weekend.

  1. Who needs a wedding when you can elope to Iceland?
  2. The best moments of the World Cup.
  3. Fairy Tales, in real life.
  4. Living with less is more, in Indonesia.
  5. Tips for summer shooting.
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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Mpix Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/friday-foto-favorites-7-18 Fri, 18 Jul 2014 16:00:00 GMT
What it’s like to be a music photographer http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/what-it-s-like-to-be-a-music-photographer  

Much like breaking into the music industry as a recording artist, most music photographers aren’t going to make millions. “There isn’t much money in photographing live music, unless you are working for a larger magazine,” says UK-based music and event photographer Martin Hobby. But like any true artist, be it musical, performance or photographic, they do it for the love of it. “Even if it’s just for a free ticket and beer!” Jokes Hobby.

We talked to three professional photographers who decided to add music to their resume—from country enthusiasts to metal heads—to marry their two greatest passions: music and photography.

Martin Hobby, Kent/London, England

Also shoots: weddings, commercial

www.willshootforrum.co.uk

What got you interested in music photography?

I have always been a music fan, and I’ve always been a photographer (21 years this year). But it was relatively recently, in 2010, that I decided to combine the two—I think I just wanted to take my work in a different direction, and there is a healthy live music scene in the town I live in, so I started covering local shows.

How can one get into the music photography business?

Getting into it is quite easy; just turn up at a local show with a camera and shoot the bands. Like with anything, it’s about networking and getting out there—go chat with the bands after their set, build rapport and trust, if your work is good enough and you are a cool person to be around, things will happen.

Where does the majority of your income come from with this type of work?

Either being commissioned by a magazine to cover a band, or by bands and their management companies if they need to get photos for PR or artwork.

What is your dream shoot?

Tom Waits. I would love to make a portrait of him.

What are the challenges you face when shooting a concert?

Smaller venues can have really crappy lighting or no lighting, but they may allow you to use flash, which the larger venues often don’t, so you are at the mercy of the lighting guy. Also, at most larger shows you are only allowed to shoot for the first three songs (with no flash), so you may only have ten minutes to get your shots! I actually quite like this, as it gives me a definite time in which to nail it, and then I get to watch the band.

Do you aim to photograph a specific genre, or all kinds?

I started off covering a lot of heavy metal shows as that was mainly what the local bands played, and I went to Bloodstock Festival a few times, and they used some of my shots for their advertising. Now I mainly shoot for indie magazines, so I cover a real variety, which is great as I love hearing new music—especially if it’s a style I’m not really aware of. The most recent band that blew me away was tUnE-yArDs. It was definitely not my usual cup of tea but was amazing to see live.

You work for several music magazines. How were you able to get your foot in the door?

My first big break came through meeting an old friend at a party—he was then the picture editor for one of the UK’s biggest music magazines. It still took me two years from the initial conversation before he felt I was good enough to work for him.

What is your favorite part about the music industry?

Giving something back to the bands that have inspired and shaped my life. I remember as a kid looking at album covers and pictures of bands in magazines. It’s something to look up to. If I can do the same and inspire the next generations to pick up cameras and follow in my footsteps, that would be the best thing in the world.


Sara Kauss, Jupiter, FL

Also shoots: weddings

www.sarakaussmusicians.com

How did you get into the music photography business?

I’ve photographed weddings for almost nine years now, and about four years ago, I went to Nashville for an event and literally ran into a country music artist whose music I knew from growing up. Talking with him, I learned a little bit about the music industry today, and I set forth networking and meeting more people after that.

What’s your tip for aspiring music photographers?

You have to be passionate about it. A lot of photographers I’ve met are just in the business to make a living, and they truly don’t care, or sometimes even know, about the artist they are shooting. And it shows—their images are lacking passion. If you like a band, connect with them on social media and see if they need a photographer for their next event.

What is your concert shoot gear?

Two Canon bodies, one with a 135mm or 2.0 (or 300mm 2.8, if farther from the stage), and a wide angle, 24mm 1.4 and/or 14mm 2.8) and my Shootsac bag for switching lenses. At a concert, you’re moving quickly and need to not have luggage!

What genre do you primarily shoot?

Country! I’m a cowboy-boot wearing, outdoor, deep sea fishing, woods hunting with my husband kind of girl. But I appreciate all kinds of music. So if I shoot an artist from a genre I don’t know, I get to know their music first and find a groove.

Tell us about an unforgettable moment backstage.

Running into Kenny Chesney and being able to tell him that my husband and I just named our new South Florida property after his song “Lucky Old Sun” was neat. It was a brief, but meaningful, conversation.

What is the most surprising thing about the music industry you’ve learned throughout the years?

There are a hundred people involved in one singer’s career. Success isn’t an overnight thing. Being an artist is one of the hardest jobs anyone could have. Just like us photographers, the perception is we show up and shoot, without realizing all the back end work that goes into what we do, from editing to taxes. Just like us, musicians are running a business, and it takes a lot of people to help them succeed. It’s a career of love, for sure!

What are some of your favorite shows you’ve shot?

Because I genuinely love music, my favorite shows are songwriters singing in a round at The Bluebird Café or The Listening Room in Nashville. Big lights and lots of stage are amazing and cool to photograph! But to me, it’s all about capturing something unique about an artist that not many people get to see, and sharing those moments to tell the story of the artist.
 

Amiee Stubbs, Nashville, TN

Shoots: animal portraits

www.amieestubbs.com/concerts

What got you interested in music photography?

In high school I used to come up with clever ways to sneak my camera into shows. I’ve actually been photographing concerts since I was shooting film back in the early ‘90s. Those photos weren’t good by any stretch, but I still cherish them. Music has always been my biggest passion, and I wanted a personal way to remember all the shows I’d seen.

How did you get into the music photography business?

I was determined to get my foot in the door, so over the years I built up a decent portfolio with images I’d taken while I was sitting in paid seats. Once I felt comfortable with my body of work, I started reaching out to anyone with an address on Music Row asking them to give me a chance. National Shows 2 said yes, and I’ve been working for them ever since.

Tell us about an unforgettable show moment.

Nashville was home to Vince Vaughn’s Wild West Comedy Festival back in May, and the cast of Impractical Jokers, my favorite TV show, was doing a show at The Ryman. I was photographing the show for them, and at the end of the night I walked on stage to get a photo of the guys with the entire crowd behind them. It was pretty amazing to be standing on such a historic stage, looking out at the crowd, with some of my favorite comedians posing for my camera.

What is your dream shoot?

I’d love to be photographing U2, for U2. I’ve seen U2 in concert 37 times over the years. I’ve loved all the shows equally, but if I had to pick a favorite, there was a show in Chicago in 2009 that had the perfect set list.

Are there times when you want to put down the camera and just enjoy the show?

I’ve actually noticed that it’s hard for me to enjoy a show without my camera now. I think combining my love of music and photography just heightens the experience.

What is the first step of getting into music photography?

It’s really not too hard to bring a camera into a show now. A lot of my early work was done on different Lumix point-and-shoot cameras, because I was too scared to risk bringing in my DSLR. And the ISO technology is a million times better now than it was back then. Take the opportunities you can to get some practice!

What is your favorite part about music photography?

Trying to capture the sound, the emotion and the experience in a single moment. Even if that band on that stage isn’t one of my favorites, I know there’s someone in that crowd who loves them more than anything.

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(ZenBlog) Amiee Stubbs Martin Hobby Sara Kauss Zenfolio galleries marketing music music photography photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/what-it-s-like-to-be-a-music-photographer Mon, 14 Jul 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 7.11 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/friday-foto-favorites-7-11 Each week, we scour the web to find the most off-kilter photos, gear and articles so you don’t have to. Happy reading and have an even happier weekend.


 

  1. A triple lightning strike occurs in downtown Chicago.
  2. Sometimes, it’s hard to let go of an ex.
  3. A beautiful mixture of photography and paint.
  4. Shooting your first wedding? Read this.
  5. Get your camera out tonight. Here’s a star photography tutorial.
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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/friday-foto-favorites-7-11 Fri, 11 Jul 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Everything You Need to Know About Our Latest Release http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/everything-you-need-to-know-about-our-latest-release We hear your feature requests and work very hard to make them happen. Here, you’ll find the highlights of our latest feature release, which will let you do and sell more amazing things right from your Zenfolio website. Prepare to smile.

 

One-Step Folder Upload

Save time and energy with our new one-step folder uploader. Instead of manually uploading groups, you can upload the entire folder structure from your computer to your Zenfolio dashboard in one easy step. Groups and galleries will automatically be created to match.

Click the new Upload link from within any group using the Chrome web browser, and then drag a folder from your computer into the uploader.

START UPLOADING

Favorites Icon

Make it easy for clients to track their favorites with the new heart icon feature. They can click on the heart icon as it hovers over each picture, and that image will be automatically saved to their Favorites list.

Coupon Creation

No more manual marketing efforts. Create a batch of coupons, set up the details and quantity, and they will be generated automatically.

CREATE COUPONS

 

Mpix Modern Metals

Turn your favorite prints into something truly unique. Introducing Modern Metals from Mpix These durable metal prints are float mounted on 1/16” aluminum and are ready to hang as soon as they arrive.

SHOP NOW

Retouching Services

No one is perfect—especially in photos. Now you can offer retouching services from Mpix, MpixPro and Miller’s to your clients so they can say goodbye to braces, gray hairs, red eye, eyeglasses glare and more. Add retouching to your price lists today so clients can buy these services alongside their prints.

ADD NOW

Miller’s Signature Albums

Something you should definitely add to your price lists: MpixPro Signature Albums. These gorgeous, leather-bound albums come in a variety of colors and have a sleek, contemporary style clients will love. They’re easy to make too, with the drag-and-drop album creation maker. Available in a variety of sizes, these albums are ones not to miss.

BROWSE ALBUMS

One Vision Imaging Lay Flat Photo Books

Finally, the UK can offer photo books to clients with the new One Vision Imaging lay flat photo books! Available in 8x8, A4 portrait, and A5 portrait and landscape, there’s a size for any occasion.

These albums are also drag-and-drop, so you or your clients can easily build them in minutes.

BROWSE BOOKS

Ivoke Trinkets

Photography doesn’t always have to be two-dimensional. Offer these fun, unique products to your clients, such as the Ivoke aluminum magnets for the fridge.

SHOP NOW

So go ahead and add these new products to your price list and play with the new features today. For all of the information about this release, read the release notes.

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(ZenBlog) Ivoke Millers Mpix One Vision Imaging Zenfolio coupon feature notes feature release features galleries marketing new features photo photographer photography portfolio printing prints professional professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/everything-you-need-to-know-about-our-latest-release Tue, 08 Jul 2014 16:00:00 GMT
The BIG event is here. Save 50% on all 11x14 and larger Mpix prints http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/the-big-event-is-here-save-50-on-all-11x14-and-larger-mpix-prints

 

Starting today, save 50% on all 11x14 and larger Mpix prints. With savings this big, now is the time to update your home décor with beautiful prints.

Hurry, this sale only lasts until July 9, so shop now and save on Mpix prints 11x14 and larger—the perfect size for framing and mounting.

Not a Zenfolio user yet? You can still take advantage of this special offer.

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

  • This sale will be effective from 7/8/2014 12:01 a.m. PDT until 7/9/2014 11:59 p.m. PDT and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.
  • This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.
  • The discount is only applicable on Mpix prints sized 11x14 or larger.
  • The discount is only applicable to orders with destination addresses in the United States and Canada.
  • For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.
  • The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.
  • This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  
  • If you are looking to pass this sale on to your clients, please read our Sales FAQ.
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(ZenBlog) 50% off Mpix Zenfolio coupon discount galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio printing prints professional professional photographer professional photography promotion sale selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/the-big-event-is-here-save-50-on-all-11x14-and-larger-mpix-prints Tue, 08 Jul 2014 07:00:00 GMT
Photographer's Corner: A Pro Photographer’s Strategies for Selling Success http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/photographers-corner-a-pro-photographer-s-strategies-for-selling-success

Establishing a beautiful website with amazing work, as many have found, is not enough to make your business soar. It takes an understanding of your chosen market to motivate your clients to go to your website, click Buy and complete their purchases. 

There is no magic manual that explains how to establish a site that sells; it requires extensive research and experience to know what strategies are most effective. One way to do this is to change the relationship you have with your clients. Establishing a personal relationship with your clients and treating them as friends can only enhance your business.

We chatted with professional wedding photographer Evan Chung on how this strategy has helped his business. What we found was that it’s all about being Mr. Nice Guy.

The Pro: Evan Chung, wedding photographer

Evan, like many, came into the professional photography world via fine art with an interest in emotion and portraiture, which then translated into weddings. His wedding business has been thriving since 2007. In his words, it was the perfect union between portraiture and fine art.

To date, Evan has photographed more than 70 weddings. He received the 2014 Editors’ Choice Award from Two Bright Lights and has been featured in online publications such as Wedding Wire, Love+Wander, and much more.

When you meet Evan, you can sense that he sincerely is a nice guy. Being kind is the first strategy he embraces with his customers, and it serves him well. He explains more about this and other strategies for success.

People respond to warmth, consideration and care. So Evan’s rule of thumb is to embrace the client relationship and cultivate it. Here are some examples of what this looks like for him.   

Be Responsive

When Evan receives an initial inquiry from a customer, he responds the same day, usually within hours. He strives to keep up this timely responsiveness through the day of the event and beyond. This builds trust and lets the customer know you care.

Build Confidence

Evan prefers to sit down with his customers face to face in order to get to know them and learn more about their wedding day. It also gives his customers the opportunity to see how he works and view some examples of what he offers. Together, they analyze the day and schedule of events. By embracing this conversation, he helps his customers feel confident that they are on the same page and that he understands their needs.  

Personalize the Product

Because each customer is different, Evan sells sessions that are personalized for the client and strays away from selling predesigned packages. Creating packages that are tailored just for them allows them to feel that their needs are important and are going to be met… within their budget.

When his clients trust that everything will be handled well by their photographer they can simply focus on getting married, which ultimately leads to better photos.

Prepare for the Sale

Evan doesn’t rely on his website alone to sell the products he offers. During the initial consultation, he puts the products that are available to buy in their hands to touch and feel, so they can see for themselves what is available. When he does this, he is able to upsell many products and help clients overcome any hesitancy to purchase by allowing them to see how great they are in person. For Evan, in-person sales are crucial for helping his customers understand the products that are available on his website.

After the event is over, Evan follows up, and within a few days after the event he posts a quick teaser with a couple of photos in a blog post. He shares the blog post link with the wedding party and on social media to keep everyone excited about seeing the rest of the images.

In preparation for getting to know the guests at the event, (his new potential customer base), Evan creates cards ahead of time with his website link and info on how to get to the gallery. Knowing that images will not be available right away for his visitors, he creates a placeholder image for the gallery, using one of the teaser images with text that informs visitors that the images will be coming soon.

Creating cards for the event has allowed him to drive more sales through his site and generate more email interest from the guests. This strategy is also incredibly helpful when you have a photo booth at events because people love to come back and see all the photos taken.

Lastly, to capture his visitors’ information, Evan uses Visitor Sign In to collect email addresses of people who visit the gallery. Because of this, he is able to send out a detailed message to let these customers know when the images are ready. (This is not spamming; it’s giving customers specific and relevant information. Nice guys don’t spam.)

People love discounts, and even more than that they love the word free. This is why it’s important to think carefully about how you price your work and include room to offer discounts. This is the strategy that Evan embraces, and he creates a price list padded with margins so he can start high and give things away.

Evan also uses coupons to reduce prices and drive sales. The newly married couple gets a coupon to use within the first three months after the wedding. He also posts general coupons seasonally on his homepage, in his blog, and on social media for all guests who come to the site.

But it doesn’t stop there. Evan also motivates people to purchase a specific amount of prints with a delicious carrot. For example, he may have a price of $400 for all edited high-resolution images. However, if a client spends this amount on products, then they get the images for free.

The bottom line is that you can motivate your clients to buy a certain amount of products by offering a special carrot personalized for them. This may be labor-intensive, but it’s definitely worth it.

An old saying still holds true today: “The customer always comes first.” It’s helpful to remember that your clients continue to be the most important people, long after the event. This is because photo-worthy, major life milestones don’t stop happening after the big day. People are always getting married, having a baby, throwing a party, etc. If you are personable, approachable and friendly, you are more likely to connect with these people and be able to share your talent since referrals are one of the top ways to get new business.

With this in mind, Evan strives to continue cultivating the relationships he has with his clients by sending out gifts after the event. Case in point: He sends newlyweds a gift for their one-year anniversary, such as a vivid metal print from MpixPro. The clients can see the value of this product by going to his website and seeing his prices and will fondly remember their big day and further appreciate him as the nice person he is.

The Added Benefits of Gifts

Sending gifts also gives you the opportunity to thank your clients for their business and reminds them that you still exist. Lastly, having a beautiful print on your customer’s wall ensures that your work is being represented in the best way possible, not only as a representation of what you create, but for others to see and appreciate. So, when your future client-to-be walks by that gorgeous print, then stops to say, “Hey, who took this photo? I love it and need a photographer!”… a new relationship is born. Don’t you love a happy ending?

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(ZenBlog) Photographer's Corner Zenfolio coupon discount galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio printing prints professional professional photographer professional photography promotion sale selling selling strategies http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/photographers-corner-a-pro-photographer-s-strategies-for-selling-success Mon, 07 Jul 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 7.4 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/friday-foto-favorites-7-4

Each week, we scour the web to find the most off-kilter photos, gear and articles so you don’t have to. Happy reading and have an even happier weekend.

  1. These aerial views will make you rethink how you see the world.
  2. Young photos of history’s most notable public figures.
  3. Miami Vice, then and now.
  4. Read this before you see fireworks tonight.
  5. What happens when paint and photography combine.

 

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/friday-foto-favorites-7-4 Fri, 04 Jul 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Double Your Referral Credits for July http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/double-your-referral-credits-for-july

Stop what you’re doing, and email your family, friends, coworkers or people you just met, because for the month of July, you will receive DOUBLE the credit when you refer people to Zenfolio. This means:

  • You’ll earn 20% (instead of the usual 10%) credit in your account for every person you refer who opens a Zenfolio account.
  • Each of the people you refer will get a 10% discount off their new account.
  • It’s a win-win!

Use your account credit for whatever you want: renewals, upgrades, prints and product purchases, etc. And to say thank you for being an awesome Zenny, you can earn some amazing prizes, such as a Zen T-shirt or deluxe swag bag, with enough earned credit. Read full details in our help article and make the most of Double Referral Month.

Spread the news and help your friends and family save big—and you’ll get credit too—by sharing your referral code on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or through email.

Here’s How:

1. Share your referral code with one click. Go to your Edit View dashboard and look at the “Your Referrals” section in the Toolbox. From there, you can share your code via Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or Email.

2. Add referral buttons in email signatures, or on your website, to get even more referrals year-round. 

So spread the word and start referring, because this double credit is only good for the month of July. Happy sharing!

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(ZenBlog) Zenfolio earn credit galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography referral referral program selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/7/double-your-referral-credits-for-july Tue, 01 Jul 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Hometown Zennies http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/hometown-zennies There’s nothing quite like celebrating your hometown in the summer. Our stomping grounds shape us into who we are, and new cities help us grow into the people we’re meant to be. Below, you’ll find some amazing Zenfolio users who are proud of their hometown or current city. To join them, email a photo of you in front of your hometown landmark or favorite spot holding a sign that says  ‘I’m a Zenny’ to marketing@zenfolio.com and you’ll win a deluxe swag bag. Be sure to include the location of your photo and a link to your Zenfolio site in your email.

Karen Gilbride at the Colorado National Monument, Grand Junction, CO

Amiee Stubbs at the Nashville Zoo in Nashville, TN

Bernie Doran at Mt. Hood, Oregon

Carl Anderson in Cincinnati, OH

Candice Budgick in the plains of Oklahoma, OK

Chris Grigsby, Saint Louis Zoo, St. Louis, MO

Michelle Chun-Hoon in Sydney, Australia

 

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(ZenBlog) Zenfolio galleries home town hometown marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling summer http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/hometown-zennies Mon, 30 Jun 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 6.27 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/friday-foto-favorites-6-27 Each week, we scour the web to find the most off-kilter photos, gear and articles so you don’t have to. Happy reading and have an even happier weekend.

  1. Antarctica, the beautiful.
  2. Summer, in abstract form.
  3. Now, you can search by images on Google.
  4. Abandoned places always make for beautiful photographs.
  5. Award-winning iPhone photos of 2014.

 

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/friday-foto-favorites-6-27 Fri, 27 Jun 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Product Spotlight; Fundy Album Builder v6 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/product-spotlight-fundy-album-builder-v6 I’m a San Francisco Bay Area wedding photographer, and I’m all about impressions. No, not the funny voices from stand-up comedians. I’m talking about the sharp intake of breath when the groom sees his bride for the first time. I mean the exhilaration felt when the wedding party busts out a choreographed flash mob. I’m referring to the glitter of tears as the newlyweds see their wedding images for the first time. Impressions can sometimes last longer than the time spent actually making the impression. That’s why albums have become such a large part of my wedding packages.

I have no great love for designing wedding albums. If it were up to me, I’d shoot and edit a wedding without ever thinking about an album. That being said, an album can make a lasting impression on a couple that gives their wedding photos staying power. Thus, albums are here to stay, and they’ve become an important part of presenting images to a couple.

One of the hardest parts about offering albums can be the design software, so to be honest, when I was asked to review Fundy’s Album Builder v6, I was a bit hesitant. I’ve heard good things about it, but it would mean learning yet another design software when I’ve already learned such design programs as Queensberry Photo Junction, Adobe InDesign, Miller’s Designer Plus, and Graphistudio GraphiSoftware. I’m glad I did though because Fundy’s sixth and newest version of Album Builder seems to have figured out how to streamline the design process without sacrificing too much control.

Unlike past iterations of Album Builder, which were plug-ins for Photoshop, Fundy made version 6 a stand-alone program. Inevitably, there was a steep learning curve with Fundy’s Album Builder v6, but I was impressed that Fundy had a surprisingly accessible video help section with “quick and dirty” tutorials.

The fundamental difference I found between Fundy’s Album Builder and every other album design software is that Album Builder works primarily with groupings of photos rather than single images. These groupings of photos are aptly named drop zones. I could adjust the size of each drop zone and drop (hence the name) any number of photos into the space, and the drop zone would automatically arrange the images into a smart looking layout. I would drop another image into the zone and it would redistribute to fit nicely among the others. If I didn’t like the layout, I could swap photos, shuffle them, or try a different layout entirely. I could even have multiple drop zones on the spread to show separate groupings of photos rather than one big, long spread.

At first, I was not a fan of Album Builder’s drop zones since it was so engrained in me to deal with individual photos and preset layouts for specific photo orientations. Drop zones felt too automated, as if I was sacrificing my artistic license and creative control. However, Album Builder does let you control the layouts, but not how I expected. Instead of setting the alignment, spacing, size and location of images on a spread, I could indicate the size and location of a drop zone and then adjust the drop zone settings to apply to all the contained images at once. This meant that although I started with an auto-filled layout, I could customize it to fit my creative style.

The benefit I found in using drop zones was that I could add or remove an image with different orientations or a different crop and the drop zone would automatically lay out the photos according to my drop zone settings. As I quickly wrapped my brain around this different way of designing an album, it actually felt easier once I got the hang of it. With less time spent arranging the layouts, I felt free to drop images onto a page and select the best layout. If there wasn’t a perfect layout available for those photos, I would simply pick the closest one and then tweak the settings to get it just right. This enabled me to design the album in half the time it would normally take me.

Even with all those sleek looking layouts at my disposal, I still ran into a hiccup. The project I was designing for a client was actually a book with a gutter, rather than my normal lay-flat album where the images can go edge to edge without fear of losing a subject’s face in the binding gutter. This posed a real issue since all of the auto-generated layouts gorgeously used the center space, counting on the fact that there wouldn’t be any binding gutter. This forced me to get better acquainted with the fine-tuning options of the drop zones. This definitely slowed me down, and I wouldn’t recommend using this software if you are offering books that are bound with a gutter.

Considering the extra work it took me to avoid the gutters, I thought I’d give it another try with another client’s lay-flat album (no gutter this time). This was total success. Not only was I more experienced for the task after the first book, but I could really utilize the auto-generating layouts with only minor adjustments along the way. This second album took me half the time it took to lay out the first book, which means, for lay-flat albums, my normal design time was reduced by 75%. That might be stretching it a tiny bit, but in truth, I liked this album layout so much that I ordered an extra as a studio sample.

The final albums were gorgeous, and I would certainly recommend Fundy Album Builder v6 to those in search of a streamlined album design process. I’ve used many album designer programs, and this was by far the most enjoyable experience. Cheers to more album sales and to the ever-improving album design process.

 

Evan Chung is a natural people person, and loves working with couples to document their most important moments in life. Specializing in engagement and wedding portraits, his beautiful and engaging images showcase his love for people and capturing emotions on camera. It is easy to see his dedication to his craft and his ongoing effort to always capture that oh so perfect shot. Check out his work at his website: http://www.evanchungphoto.com/

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(ZenBlog) Evan Chung Fundy Fundy Software Product Spotlight Zenfolio album builder album design albums galleries marketing photo albums photo books photographer photography portfolio prints professional professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/product-spotlight-fundy-album-builder-v6 Mon, 23 Jun 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Half off Happy Summer Sale — 8x10 prints http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/half-off-happy-summer-sale-8x10-prints

During the summer life is just… easier, and definitely more relaxing. Keep that good feeling going and save 50% on 8x10 prints from Mpix, One Vision Imaging, Photobox, Nulab, and NuShots through June 25.

Additionally, Mpix is offering 50% off 11x14 prints. But hurry, this three-day sale only lasts until June 25 at 11:59 p.m. PDT.

As always, no coupon code is necessary to receive the discount. The sale ends June 25, so be sure to place your orders today.

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

  • This sale will be effective from 06/23/2014 12:01 a.m. PDT(UTC -7) until 06/25/2014 11:59 p.m. PDT(UTC -7) and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.
  • This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.
  • The discount is applicable on 8x10 prints and 11x14 prints only (Mpix)
  • For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.
  • The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.
  • This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  
  • If you are looking to pass this sale on to your clients, please read our Sales FAQ.

 

 

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(ZenBlog) Imaging Mpix NuShots Nulab One Photobox Vision Zenfolio coupon discount galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio printing prints professional professional photographer professional photography promotion sale selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/half-off-happy-summer-sale-8x10-prints Mon, 23 Jun 2014 07:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 6.20 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/friday-foto-favorites-6-20

Each week, we scour the web to find the most off-kilter photos, gear and articles so you don’t have to. Happy reading and have an even happier weekend.

  1. This 20-year-old photographer can run with the best of them.
  2. This free app notifies you when Golden Hour is about to start.
  3. Moving trains are an art.
  4. Here’s what you need to know about the new Creative Cloud.
  5. Kenya, at sunrise and sunset.

 

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/friday-foto-favorites-6-20 Fri, 20 Jun 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Behind the Shot http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/behind-the-shot

A picture is worth a thousand words, sure. But have you ever wondered what was reeling in the minds of the photographer as soon as they released the shutter? We asked several photographers to share their personal favorite shots and the stories behind them. From pulling all-nighters to capture the best lighting to traveling the corners of the globe to touching life tales of their subjects, here’s proof that there’s much more to a photo than simply pointing and shooting. Here, three seasoned photographers recount what it took to get that perfect shot.

 

Rain in the Shower by Eleanor Bennett

“For about three years I have been trying to get my best picture of this dilapidated house. My previous images had too much shadow; overly soft light, not enough focus, and branches would often get in the way. Every week when I walk to the nearest town, I always see this house slowly showing more and more of its weathering effects due to the owners’ neglect.  

On a nice, bright, sunny day I only just managed recently to secure this image showing the extent of the damage. You can make out the wood from the rear of a dressing table and see a rotten window frame, pink curtains and exposed brickwork. A little part of me is looking forward to see how it progresses as a composition in the following 18 months with the harsh and often violent weather we get with gale-force winds and heaps of snow. It is nice to make the observation of how human dwellings would degrade if we just vanished from our domains.”

 

Autumn Reflections by David Liam Kyle (©David Liam Kyle)

“While on assignment for the Western Reserve Land Conservancy, the rain began to fall heavily so I packed my gear and headed for home. I decided to swing by a local lake on the way to check the fall foliage. When I arrived the rain stopped, but it was getting late. I grabbed my camera to scout for areas to photograph on another day. No one was around because of the rain and the sun had already set. The lake was calm and I loved the tranquility -- it was totally peaceful. 

I quickly grabbed my tripod before it was too dark. The light was dropping, and I took several images with long exposures to compensate. I went back for several days to try and capture an even better image, but the conditions and mood were never the same. I love this one the best. I hope you can feel the tranquility and appreciate the beautiful colors of Autumn Reflections as I did when I captured a glimpse of nature and a fraction of God's artwork.”


Ojai Nude Study by David Jordan Williams

“I was in Ojai, California, working with an author on a very involved book on the magic properties of herbs. It was a coffee table book, which has been in the production stage for four plus years. The shoot lasted most of the day, and I was staying at The Ojai Valley Inn and Spa while shooting in Ojai.

The first night there, I had noticed that the balcony had a very interesting architecture and I decided to try to put something together photographically. That next morning, while at breakfast with the author, I was mentioning the idea and he suggested using a life model friend of his as a subject. I agreed and we met with the model later that day. I suggested that we try some nudes in the room, and I ended up shooting a series of images of her through the window and curtains, all the while being careful not to let anyone in management (or anyone else for that matter) see us. I hadn't made arrangements to use the location due to the spontaneous nature of the shoot. Luckily, my room faced out into the Ojai hills and not into the rest of the hotel. The only lighting involved was the interior lighting from the room and an almost full moon outside in the early evening. I was very happy with the results of the shoot and the relaxed, stylized, informal feeling of the final imagery. I attribute the excellent results to the loose nature of the shoot and willingness on everyone's part to experiment and not over think it.”

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(ZenBlog) Behind the Shot David Jordan Williams David Liam Kyle Eleanor Bennett Zenfolio behind the scenes galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/6/behind-the-shot Wed, 18 Jun 2014 16:00:00 GMT