ZenBlog: Blog http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog en-us (C) ZenBlog (ZenBlog) Tue, 25 Nov 2014 23:20:00 GMT Tue, 25 Nov 2014 23:20:00 GMT Product Spotlight: Video in Photoshop http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/product-spotlight-video-in-photoshop

Review by Shelley Paulson

 

I’ve been a professional photographer now for more than 10 years, but in 2014, I made the decision to branch out and make short, DSLR films, specifically focused in the equine industry (an area of specialty with my photography). I thought that because I could use my photography cameras for video, how hard could it be? Well, I’ve learned that the answer is, actually, it’s quite hard.

Video and filmmaking is a completely different beast than photography. I needed to invest in thousands of dollars of gear, learn how to set up my cameras differently, work within the technical limits of the gear, and… don’t even get me started on audio. Getting great sound has been one of the biggest challenges of them all.

For my first few films, I dove into learning Adobe Premiere Pro CC. I was mildly familiar with the process of video editing. In a past career, part of my job was video creation. I was relieved to find out that video editing software has matured and is much easier to use now. However, I have found myself wishing for my photo editing standbys of Lightroom and Photoshop when it comes to color grading, which is a fancy video term for color correction, my footage.

When I was asked to look at “Video in Photoshop” from Photoshop Cafe, I had mixed feelings. Part of me was excited about the possibility of being able to color grade in Photoshop. But a bigger part of me was quite skeptical about Photoshop being robust enough to do serious video editing.

It turns out both my optimism and skepticism were right.

To be fair, Colin Smith, the host of this series, does say at the start that this is geared for photographers and designers, not professional videographers. And I would agree with that. If I had never used Premiere, and was making only basic videos and slideshows, this would be a great place to start.

Part 1: Editing Video

In the beginning of the Editing Video section, Colin does a great job of covering the basics of capturing video, using anything from an iPhone to DSLR. He discusses the basics of gear, as well as exposure and the need for filtering. Frame rates and shutter speeds are covered, without becoming too technical or dry.

From there, he walks step-by-step through how to set up a Photoshop workspace for motion, bring in clips, rearrange them on the timeline, work with audio, and set up transitions. All the clips needed to follow along are included on the DVD, and the pace was easy to follow. A few times I would have to pause or rewind a few seconds because I lost track, got distracted, or couldn’t see where his mouse was pointed. The interface for watching the videos made this very easy, though at times I wished for more resolution in the video, so I could see where that mouse was pointing!

My favorite part of this section was when he showed how to create motion graphics. I had no idea that I would be able to create graphics, set them in motion, and then export for use in another video program, like Premiere. I’m likely to try this because Photoshop is a comfortable graphic environment for me, whereas After Effects is a little beyond my skill level right now.

Part 2: Slideshows

I wasn’t expecting to find a great tutorial on how to create custom slideshows! The tools found in Photoshop are easy to use. You can set the duration and pan/zoom motion of each slide individually, and add a music track to bring it all together.

Part 3: Additional Skills

Just when I thought the tutorial was winding down, Colin brought in a piece of footage from his quadcopter that was pretty flat in appearance. What he did next BLEW MY MIND.

He opened it up in a Camera Raw filter.

I literally said, “No way!” several times until my husband came to my office to see what I was freaking out about.

To have a photography-like interface for color grading my footage at my fingertips changes everything. I have struggled with the tools native to Premiere, don’t have the time to learn After Effects, and haven’t wanted to invest in a third-party color grading software until I have the basics down. And now I find out I had the best tool all along!

It’s not a perfect solution, because I will have to leave Premiere to color correct, which will add another step for me. However, this capability alone will make it more likely I will do some simple video editing in Photoshop and skip Premiere altogether.

Colin also demonstrated how to fix lens distortion for super wide lenses like you find on a GoPro and also how to import a time lapse, which was very easy.

Putting It to the Test

The day after watching this tutorial, I went out to a friend’s farm and filmed her horses running through a fresh snowfall. I used 60 frames per second, with the intention to bring the footage into a 24 fps timeline and achieve slow motion. It wasn’t until after I went out and filmed that I realized I should have checked to make sure Photoshop could do that. Thankfully, it has this capability, and I spent a few hours choosing footage, editing clips, color grading and putting it all to music.

Having watched the video, I had the basics down, but one very basic thing Colin didn’t cover was how to cut a clip. He showed how to make a clip shorter by dragging either end, but sometimes I want to take several pieces out of the same clip. I was able to find the answer by Googling.

I would position Photoshop somewhere between iMovie and Premiere. Photoshop brings in more control on a lot of levels, so I think even a hobbyist video producer would enjoy using Photoshop for editing video.

The tutorial itself was easy to follow, and Colin Smith does a great job of giving you a lot of information while keeping it interesting. I would highly recommend this video tutorial for anyone just getting started editing video or making custom slideshows.

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(ZenBlog) Photoshop Cafe Shelley Paulson Video in Photoshop photography professional photographer video http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/product-spotlight-video-in-photoshop Mon, 24 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 11.21 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-21

1.     Newspapers without photos seem to lose their luster.

2.     Is this what the George Lucas museum will look like?

3.     A fine line between life and death can be very beautiful.

4.     Cats and humans—they’re not so different.

5.     This series takes a look at the lives of soldiers outside of the military. 

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-21 Fri, 21 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Behind the Shot http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/behind-the-shot A picture is worth a thousand words, sure. But have you ever wondered what was reeling in the minds of the photographer as soon as they released the shutter? We asked several photographers to share their personal favorite shots and the stories behind them. From pulling all-nighters to capture the best lighting to traveling the corners of the globe to touching life tales of their subjects, here’s proof that there’s much more to a photo than simply pointing and shooting. Here, three seasoned photographers recount what it took to get that perfect shot.

Sauti by Peter Stanley

“Sauti za Busara, the Zanzibar music festival, takes place every February and is a celebration of African music and culture. I live a short ferry ride away in Dar es Salaam and have been coming to this festival for the past six years. I used to squeeze through the crowds with my DSLR and try to capture the event as best I could just as a personal photography challenge.

In 2011, I sent some of my images to the festival organizers with the hope of volunteering in the coming year. I was welcomed to the team, and when I arrived I felt like a fish out of water. Making pictures is where I find my footing and feel most comfortable, yet here I was in a room of photographers and journalists looking over schedules and shot lists and deadlines for uploading. It was all new to me and intimidating to say the least.

The event is four days long, and each day I went out to make the best pictures I could and then spent hours after the show ended, usually from 1-4 a.m., editing and uploading to our distribution site. I put a huge amount of time into it because I loved the feeling of supporting this wonderful event with my images, and in the end I made some pictures that really made me feel like my photography had been lifted to the next level.

When I arrived to shoot Sauti za Busara 2013, the director of photography did not hand me a shot list; instead he simply said, “We really like your stuff from last year, so get out there, shoot as many acts a you can, and have fun.” That gave me a lot of energy, but it also meant shooting from the afternoon (relaxed traditional music) through the last act (local hip hop). As you can imagine, the light, the mood, and the crowd changed dramatically from bright afternoon sunshine with families picnicking to intense stage lights and smoke machines with a packed house creating dust with their dance.

The experience really stretched my photographic knowledge, and I was glad that before this event I had reviewed as many blogs and podcasts as possible to learn tips/tricks on concert photography. Also, having invested in new camera gear (D800 and Nikkor 50mm f1.4) made a big difference in my ability to deal with very low light at times.”


Love Life by Kevin Mullins

“Although I’m a wedding photographer by trade, I shoot a lot of street photography and social documentary photography for my own personal work, and I was recently approached to shoot a Caesarean birth here in the UK. A lot of hoops had to be jumped through in terms of getting permission from the midwives and the surgeons involved. The mother is a professional photographer herself and had been attracted to my reportage style approach to photography. The shoot involved me spending the whole day of the birth with mum and dad (and daughter) before and after the procedure. I had chosen to use a Fuji X100S for the shoot, as it is silent, discreet and very small. It was the perfect companion, and when the little one popped out I was thrilled and humbled (and a bit teary) to be there to take the very first photograph. It’s a touching moment, of course, and one that mum and dad have told me they will now be able to cherish, through the medium of photography, forever.”

 

Royal Portrait by John Baikie

“This commercial shoot was one of the most highly pressurised, rewarding and shortest I have ever done. I have covered many events with the royal family in Scotland but was never been allowed a one to one with Prince Charles, the future king. I had to do a promotional shot of the chairman of the Castle Trust handing over the first copy of a book to his royal highness. I had then arranged to take a shot of the royal guest with the castle (his late grandmother’s holiday home for many years and a place he visited as a child) in the background. I got just three frames and this was my favourite. Thank goodness he never blinked in any of them! It was a great experience and he chatted with me for a short time. He is a great guy and does a lot for my home county.”

 

 

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(ZenBlog) Behind the Shot John Baikie Kevin Mullins Peter Stanley Zenfolio behind the scenes event photography galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio portrait photography professional professional photographer professional photography selling wedding photography http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/behind-the-shot Mon, 17 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 11.14 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-14

1.     Nine-year-old crowned Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

2.     These photos will give you an adrenaline boost.

3.     These shots are all perfectly timed.

4.     Photographer + aspiring model daughter equals pure genius. 

5.     These art-laden metro stations will have yours beat.

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-14 Fri, 14 Nov 2014 17:01:00 GMT
Photographer’s Corner: The Art of Fine Art Photography http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/photographer-s-corner-the-art-of-fine-art-photography

Although there are many photography genres out there, there seems to be a distinctive line between client and non-client work. With the majority of photographers shooting portraits, weddings and family photos, it seems non-client work, such as landscape and fine art photography, is a not as widely discussed. We talked to three fine art photographers who sell their work on Art.com, among other outlets, about the business of their photography.

                 

 “I started out as a news photographer shooting car wrecks, house fires and high school basketball games for my hometown newspaper,” explains Paul Souders of Worldfoto. “I was consumed with dreams of journalistic glory. But in reality, the assignments were pretty prosaic.” That’s when, after 10 years of working for his local newspaper, Souders decided to leave his journalism career to start capturing things that he felt were more meaningful: wildlife and landscapes.  

 “Small-town journalism is supposed to be about telling the story of your community. I kind of feel like that’s what I still do, but wilderness areas around the world are my community, and it’s those stories I want to show,” he says.

“I’m nearly as happy shooting modern cityscapes in China as I am chasing polar bears in the arctic.” As a full-time photographer, Souders makes his living working with two of the largest stock agencies out there, Corbis Images and Getty Images. He then uses that money toward new trips and projects to feed his passion.

“The photos can wind up nearly anywhere, from a two-page spread in National Geographic to a billboard in Mozambique to an advertisement for Mexican condoms.”

                 

As fas as advertising his work, Souders admits he’s not big on social media:

“It’s hard to stay in touch from onboard a small boat in the arctic ice pack or on a safari in some remote corner of Botswana. Hard to imagine, but there are still places on the earth where you’re free from the burdens of social media.” So, he relies on entering competitions and on his agencies to share his work. That’s how Aneta Ivanova got her start, by participating in contests in her home country of Bulgaria, and abroad—but this 22-year-old, unlike Souders, also relies on social media to market her work.

“[Fine art] gave me the freedom to visualize what I was seeing in my head, and most importantly, it didn’t limit me in any way like some types of photography do.” Her best selling products? The ones she puts the most time and effort in. “The style is usually double exposure.” Ivanova sells her work on platforms such as Art.com and Society6, and she also sells usage rights to some of her images. And unlike Souders, photography is not her full-time job.

“I chose [fine art photography] because I can create whatever I want when I want without worrying if the piece I’m working will sell or not. I chose to continue doing photography while having a primary job from which my income comes.”

In fact, photographer Evan Morris Cohen admits to doing no marketing whatsoever for his photography.

“If people find me I’m sure they were meaning to click on someone else and found me by accident,” he jokes. The fine art photographer, whose best-selling photos are of architecture featuring empty streets of New York City and the Brooklyn Bridge, says that photography chose him.

“For years I drifted in and out of photography. Some years back I started collecting and shooting vintage cameras, and I drifted back into photography—and I’ve stayed ever since.” Customers love his vintage-looking photos, which are aimed to look like they were taken years ago.

“It’s what happens when you shoot with 50- or 60-year-old film. You never know how it’s going to come out, or if it will even come out at all.”

So whether full- or part-time, these photographers all have one thing in common: they have a passion for creating their own images out in the wild, without relying on the confines of client work.

“I don’t shoot with a client in mind; I shoot the images that capture my imagination,” says Souders.

 

To view more of their work, visit Art.com.

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(ZenBlog) Zenfolio fine art marketing photographer photography professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/photographer-s-corner-the-art-of-fine-art-photography Mon, 10 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Save 30% on High-Quality Prints http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/save-30-on-high-quality-prints

Show off your hard work by turning your photos into professional quality prints from Mpix, MpixPro, One Vision Imaging, PhotoBox, Nulab and NuShots, and save 30% through November 12.

As always, no coupon code is necessary when you order through your Zenfolio account. This sale ends November 12 at 11:59 p.m. PST, so be sure to place your orders today.

 

 

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

•   This sale will be effective from November 10, 2014 at 12:01 a.m. PST until November 12 at 11:59 p.m. PST only and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.

•   This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.

•   The following vendors are participating in the promotion: Mpix, MpixPro, One Vision Imaging, PhotoBox, Nulab and NuShots.

•   For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.

•   The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.

•   This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  

•    Please read our Sales FAQ and blog on running a sale on your site.

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(ZenBlog) Imaging Mpix MpixPro NuShots Nulab One PhotoBox Vision Zenfolio discount marketing photographer photography prints professional photographer professional photography promotion sale selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/save-30-on-high-quality-prints Sun, 09 Nov 2014 13:01:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 11.7 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-7

1.     Behold, the first photo of a human being.

2.     Does this owl have a thing against photographers?

3.     What NYC’s Chinatown looked like in the ‘80s.

4.     Crafty daughter puts herself in her mother’s childhood photos.

5.     Holding onto summer as long as possible: here are beautiful firefly trails.

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/friday-foto-favorites-11-7 Fri, 07 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Day in the Life of a Zenfolio Engineer http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/day-in-the-life-of-a-zenfolio-engineer

Unlike many of the others here at Zenfolio, you’ve never spoken with or seen me, but I’ve been here behind the scenes taking care of you. It’s not that I’m hiding, but as an engineer that’s where I work best. I’m Stephen Daugherty, and I’m a Senior Software Developer at Zenfolio and kind of a nerd—in a good way of course!

Clearly I don’t have enough cameras

I have to admit that I absolutely love programming. Growing up I knew exactly what kind of career I wanted to have before leaving elementary school. Working at Zenfolio is less a job for me and more of an avenue to exercise that passion. Projects vary from systems work, to issues trouble shooting, to developing new features and more. Whatever the task, it’s always a unique challenge for all of us on the team.

It’s easier to code with cute things around you

I’ve earned a reputation around the office as a bit of a diet soda fiend. I probably go through two liters every day and then some. Luckily, Zenfolio provides drinks in the office. There’s some friendly ribbing involved, but it’s all in good fun. Besides, everyone knows better than to get between me and my soda!

Must drink diet soda…

Outside of the office my main hobby is working on an anime and comics convention with my wife called Kraken Con. What is it? Well think of something along the lines of San Diego Comic-Con but smaller and including Japanese animation as a focus. We’ve been doing it for around a year now, and it’s already grown to almost 3,000 attendees! Check out some photos from the conventions at photos.krakencon.com, and if you find yourself in the SF Bay Area in April or October we’d love it if you joined us!

The costume contest at Kraken Con

I’ve been at Zenfolio for more than two years now, and I can’t imagine working anywhere else. Everyone works together to deliver the best experience for our customers, and we all support each other. Sometimes the hours get long for the developers, but it’s worth it to deliver for all our Zennies—and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

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(ZenBlog) Stephen Daugherty Zenfolio code photographer programming http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/day-in-the-life-of-a-zenfolio-engineer Wed, 05 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Q&A with the 2014 Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/q-a-with-the-2014-pink-lady-food-photographer-of-the-year

Zenfolio is delighted to be a partner of the Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year, the world’s leading food award celebrating the art and diversity of food photography. Tessa Bunney of the UK and Lao PDR was announced as Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year 2014 earlier this year for her image “Noodle Making” from her series “Home Work.” The series explored “craft” villages in the suburbs and villages in and around Hanoi, Vietnam. We asked Tessa all about her photography.

1. How did you get started in photography?

I can’t remember a time when I didn’t take photographs. When I was a child with a Kodak Instamatic on family holidays and as a teenager I would explore the village and the surrounding areas where I lived in Somerset on my bike taking pictures in the countryside and the nearby seaside in Weston-super-Mare. After I left school I did a photography foundation course at Filton Technical College in Bristol, followed by a degree in photography at West Surrey College of Art and Design in Farnham.

2. Tell us about your photography business

I am a British freelance documentary photographer, but at the moment I am currently based in Vientiane, Lao PDR, where I am working on my long-term project ‘The Corridor of Opportunity,’ which is funded by Arts Council England and undertaking editorial work and commissions for NGOs throughout the Southeast Asia region. I focus on photographing farmers and small food producers, but I’ve also recently become interested in textiles. 

3. What got you interested in food photography?

I became interested in food photography through my interest in different landscapes and the way they are shaped by human activity. In the UK I am based in the North York Moors and spent many years working with small food producers and hill farmers around where I live, documenting their lives, work and connection with the landscape. Since then I have collaborated with Icelandic puffin hunters, Romanian nomadic shepherds and Sami reindeer herders in Finland. Currently I am interested in the changes taking place as Laos moves from a subsistence economy to a market-driven one and the consequences for the subsistence farmers in remote mountainous regions.

4. Tell us the story of your winning photo 

The photograph is of a noodle maker in Huu Tu village from the series ‘Home Work’ which explores ‘craft’ villages in the suburbs and villages in and around Hanoi, Vietnam. These specialise in a single product or activity, anything from palm leaf hats to incense sticks, or from noodle making to snake catching. Some of these ‘craft’ villages date back hundreds of years; while others are a more recent response to enable rural farmers to earn much needed extra income. ‘Home Work’ looks at the lives of women homeworkers, urbanisation and the consequences of industrial development in villages such as Huu Tu.

5. What is the no. 1 piece of advice you could give to food photographers?

If you are genuinely interested in the subject you are photographing and you are willing to spend time, to wait for the light and the right moment—that will be reflected in your images. I happened to be living in Vietnam at the time, but there are interesting and exciting food-related things happening on everyone’s street corner and in everyone’s home.

6. What else do you shoot?

Photographing farmers and small food producers is one my major preoccupations; however, I am also interested in textiles and have been working on a story about hemp production in remote Hmong ethnic minority villages in Laos, which will published editorially next year. In Laos I have also worked on a series about a women’s UXO clearance team working for the Mines Advisory Group, ‘The Women of UCT6,’ which was published in Financial Times Magazine.

In recent years I have also worked on several swimming-related series—Finnish ice swimmers, tidal pools in the southwest of England and the Serpentine Swimming Club in London.

7. How has the win changed your business?

It was a very welcoming confidence boost to encourage me to keep on going with my long-term projects and to tell the stories of small food producers and farmers around the world. It has been wonderful seeing the coverage of the Noodle picture across the world reproduced so many times.

8. What is your favorite part about food photography?

Aside from the actual photography, which I love, the best part is having the opportunity to meet food producers who are passionate about their way of life and their products, and of course being able to sample their food is a major perk of the job! Ian Spink's Arbroath smokies were possibly the best thing I ever tasted, and that was while working on an assignment for Gourmet magazine in Scotland.

Do you have what it takes to be next year’s winner? Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year is now open for entries and closes on Sunday, 8 February 2015.

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(ZenBlog) Pink Lady Food Photographer of the Year 2014 Noodle Making Pink Lady food photography photographer http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/q-a-with-the-2014-pink-lady-food-photographer-of-the-year Mon, 03 Nov 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Get a Jump on the Holidays: Save 20% on Holiday Cards http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/get-a-jump-on-the-holidays-save-20-on-holiday-cards

Get a head start on the holidays, and save some money at the same time. Starting November 3, save 20% on all holiday cards from Mpix, MpixPro, and One Vision Imaging.

Your loved ones are sure to be impressed with these personalized, high-quality cards. Take advantage of this sale and cross holiday cards off your seasonal to-do list.

As always, no coupon code is necessary when you order through your Zenfolio account. This sale ends November 6 at 11:59 p.m. PST, so be sure to place your order today.

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

•   This sale will be effective from November 3, 2014 at 12:01 a.m. PST until November 6, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. PST only and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.

•   This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.

•   The following vendors are participating in the promotion: Mpix, MpixPro, and One Vision Imaging.

•   For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.

•   The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.

•   This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  

•  Please read our Sales FAQ and blog on running a sale on your site.

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(ZenBlog) Zenfolio christmas cards galleries holiday cards marketing photographer photography portfolio professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/11/get-a-jump-on-the-holidays-save-20-on-holiday-cards Mon, 03 Nov 2014 01:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 10.31 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/friday-foto-favorites-10-31  

1.     Seven things you wish you learned in photo school.

2.     A celebration of color, and much more.

3.     “Found” photos from National Geographic.

4.     Just in time for Halloween, here’s some ghostly photo tips.

5.     A whole new perspective of the world through Thomas Prior

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/friday-foto-favorites-10-31 Fri, 31 Oct 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Product Spotlight: Think Tank Airport Roller Derby Camera Bag http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/product-spotlight-think-tank-airport-roller-derby-camera-bag

The pursuit of outdoor adventure and lifestyle photography involves making frequent decisions about what camera gear to take for a particular location or shoot, and the transportation method chosen for that equipment is just as important. Splitting my time between Australia and the USA means that I am always looking to minimize the effort and maximize the ease with which I can securely get all of my expensive, heavy gear across the Pacific.

As light and simple as possible is my mantra, and I have an aversion to checking expensive items in my luggage after a bad experience a few years ago when a duffel containing all of my climbing equipment went missing, never to be found by the airline. Aaargh! So lugging a too-heavy camera backpack over my shoulder and carrying a laptop bag in one hand as my carry-on items has been my usual approach.

This does look awkward though and is not kind to my shoulders when waiting in the immigration line. In addition, the eagle-eyed Qantas staff at Brisbane International Airport are known for stopping commuters and weighing their carry-on items to make sure they don’t exceed their 7kg limit—not the case in the USA. I’d be guilty as charged if caught, so escaping their notice is now going to be a lot easier when I cruise past them breezily with my cameras, lenses, laptop and iPad all neatly contained in the latest carry-on-size roller bag from Think Tank, the Airport Roller Derby. For those of us who will need off-road capability to carry photo equipment into the wilds at our destination, a backpack will have to find its way into the packing scenario somehow.

For this review I didn’t have the chance to take the bag for an airport concourse stroll, as I was busy climbing and photographing in California’s beautiful Sierra Nevada range. I tried it out instead on nature’s concourse, the glacial carved granite rock near Tuolumne Meadows campground. I’m happy to report that the four sets of dual wheels moved a heavy load (including a tripod attached externally) with aplomb across the irregular surface; it seems solid in construction and will surely stand the test of time. The handle, as expected, is adjustable to a few different lengths.

The bag itself weighs 5kgs, which is a little heavy but reflects the sturdy construction materials and design—and let’s face it, there is no way I can meet the maximum weight limit allowed anyway when carrying my complete photography kit on a flight from Australia, so the bag weight is not an issue for me.

Think Tank makes bags that look simple in appearance but do the job they’ve been designed for very well. This model is no exception, and the ability to fit two DSLR bodies plus numerous lenses and other accessories along with a 15 inch laptop and an iPad means only the rare sport or nature photographer with one or two lenses at the extreme telephoto range need look elsewhere for their equipment transport needs. There are many options for individualising how you pack items securely by moving around the Velcro dividers within the bag. There are two main slots that are fixed and where DSLR bodies with attached lenses fit snugly. It’s simple to secure a medium size tripod along the side of the bag with the included straps. A nice touch is the inclusion of a cable tether and TSA combination padlock tucked away in an external pocket. So when my flight is delayed and I am napping at the gate, the bag can be secured to the seat post for peace of mind!

All in all, the Think Tank Airport Roller Derby bag suits my needs very well for a frequent flyer with a professional kit of photographic equipment. I like the sturdy construction, there is plenty of interior space, and my shoulders are going to thank me as the wheels take over the strain of getting me from A to B.

Andrew Peacock takes adventure travel to a new level. As a medical doctor who volunteers his time in far-reaching places like India and Nepal, he feeds his photo habit by capturing the beauty and grandeur of every place he visits. With a gift for helping people as well as creating breathtaking images, Andrew has found his calling as a traveling adventure shooter. You will find the Australia-based photographer all over the globe using medicine and photography to make the world a better place. Check out Andrew’s extensive portfolio here: http://www.footloosefotography.com/

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(ZenBlog) Andrew Peacock Product Spotlight Think Tank Think Tank Airport Roller Derby Zenfolio galleries gear gear review marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography review selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/product-spotlight-think-tank-airport-roller-derby-camera-bag Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Save 25% on Prints, Cards & Photo Books http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/25-off-prints-cards-and-photo-books

Autumn leaves are changing color, and the air is getting cooler, which can only mean one thing: the holidays are fast approaching. Delight your friends and relatives with prints, cards, and photo books from Mpix, One Vision Imaging and PhotoBox and save 25% through October 29.

As always, no coupon code is necessary when you order through your Zenfolio account. This sale ends October 29 at 11:59 p.m. PDT, so be sure to place your orders today.

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

•   This sale will be effective from October 27, 2014 at 12:01 a.m. PDT until October 29 at 11:59 p.m. PDT only and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.

•   This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.

•   The following vendors are participating in the promotion: Mpix, One Vision Imaging, and PhotoBox.

•   For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.

•   The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.

•   This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  

•   Please read our Sales FAQ and blog on running a sale on your site.

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(ZenBlog) One Vision Imaging PhotoBox Zenfolio marketing photographer photography professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/25-off-prints-cards-and-photo-books Sun, 26 Oct 2014 12:01:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 10.24 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/friday-foto-favorites-10-24

1.     What the world would look like with no humans.

2.     How to create an entire darkroom in a small closet.

3.     We are fully embracing Autumn. You should, too.

4.     10 Things Henri Cartier-Bresson can teach you about street photography.

5.     50 examples of double exposures

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/friday-foto-favorites-10-24 Fri, 24 Oct 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2014 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/holiday-shipping-deadlines-2014

Let’s face it: the holidays are right around the corner. Don’t get caught rushing and stressing over getting your holiday cards and gifts purchased and mailed on time. The best solution for you and your customers to avoid the dreaded time crunch is simple: plan ahead. With that in mind, we’ve put together a list of holiday shipping dates for our partners to help bring you comfort and joy this holiday season.

Requesting Changes and Cancellations

Our partner labs have the best turnaround times in the industry while maintaining consistent print quality. They work extra hard to keep up this reputation during the holiday season—often printing, packaging, and shipping an order the same day it is placed. This means that any request for changes needs to be sent within minutes of placing an order or it might not be caught in time.

Approving Orders

Having Order Approval enabled in your price list (this is a Premium and Premium Business feature) allows you to review orders and make changes before the orders are sent for printing, but it also delays sending the orders to the lab. Orders are not submitted for printing until you approve them. With this in mind, be sure to approve all orders as quickly as possible.

A Tip for Peace of Mind

During the holiday season, USPS is not as dependable, and packages cannot be tracked. Encourage your clients to select a carrier that offers tracking, such as FedEx.

Shipping Deadlines

For your convenience, we have gathered a list of recommended deadline dates and tips for each of our integrated vendors. Please keep in mind that your orders must be placed and approved before the cutoff dates in order to be delivered in time for the holiday.

Mpix, MpixPro, and Miller’s

Mpix, a division of Miller’s Professional Imaging, delivers professional quality prints using only the best materials and packaging. MpixPro offers a variety of high-end products such as photo books, canvas gallery wraps, metal prints, and calendars. To add an elegant touch to your clients’ holiday orders, we recommend choosing Mpix Pro’s Boutique Packaging shipping method.

One Vision Imaging

Based in the UK, One Vision Imaging offers a number of traditional and non-traditional gifts and products. From acrylic “ice” prints to magnetic prints and even jigsaw puzzles there’s something for everyone on your list.

PhotoBox

PhotoBox’s state-of-the-art labs in London and Paris deliver high quality prints and photo products throughout Europe and around the world. PhotoBox is also an extremely eco-friendly company and is always looking for greener ways to do business.

NuShots and Nulab

Customers in Australia and New Zealand can choose high-quality prints, gallery wraps, and more from these cutting-edge labs. Nulab is only available to Premium Business subscribers.

fotoflōt

fotoflōt products are an elegant way to display photos without frames. Your clients are sure to be impressed by the innovative magnetic mounting system, which allows you to avoid glare and enables you to swap photos in seconds.

Imagine Your Photos

Imagine Your Photos offers a wide range of unique photo products from mouse pads and coasters to mugs, shirts, and magnets. IYP uses the latest imaging and transfer technologies on a variety of surfaces. IYP’s unique photo products make great holiday gifts.

ivoke

 

ivoke™ makes innovative, personalized products from your digital images ranging from high end, custom aluminum panels and iPhone cases to basics like mugs, mouse pads, and coasters.

PictureItPostage

 

If you plan on mailing greeting cards or sending thank you cards to clients, personalize them with custom postage stamps from PictureItPostage. You can have your brand, portrait, or any other image placed on a US postage stamp in many denominations. The high-quality stamps are printed large and add a special touch to any piece of mail.

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(ZenBlog) Miller's Mpix MpixPro NuShots Nulab One Vision Imaging PhotoBox PictureItPostage Zenfolio fotoflōt galleries holiday shipping ivoke marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/holiday-shipping-deadlines-2014 Wed, 22 Oct 2014 17:00:00 GMT
Q&A with Summer Photo Contest Winner Dan Wenc http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/q-a-with-summer-photo-contest-winner-dan-wenc

The winner of this summer’s Zen Photo Contest is Dan Wenc of DM Wenc Photography. The man behind the camera explains how his hobby became a side business and why he doesn’t stick to one genre.

 

Tell us about your photo business.

What started out as hobby photography several years ago has evolved into a small side business. Some of my photos that began as hobby photography resulted in interest from some businesses, which purchased some of my work for use in their promotional material. Another portion of my business is portrait photography.

 

What was happening when you shot your winning photo?

I was away with my wife at Hampton, New Hampshire, as part of an anniversary weekend getaway. Out for a night walk on the beach while they were having fireworks, I brought my camera and tripod along, and it was my first try at shooting fireworks. In this photo I wanted to capture the fireworks, the beach and the boardwalk at night in the background.

 

Who are your main clients?

Portrait clients make up the majority of my revenue clients, with many return clients over the years. I don’t do much advertising; I rely on email newsletters, social media and word of mouth referrals to gain customers. A secondary category of clientele are those who purchase my photographs for display in their home or business, mostly of my scenic, landscape and railroad photography work. Using Zenfolio, my followers and customers have a choice of purchasing metal, canvas or standard prints to showcase my work. I’ve found that Zenfolio is the perfect place to host my photos.

 

What kind of photography do you specialize in?

It’s not necessarily specialized; it’s wide open and evolving. Railroad photography was my specialty when I first started. My photographs have appeared in several railroad publications and other industry works. Over the past few years, I’ve taken interest in other areas of photography, such as landscape and local points of interest in the Southern New England area. I also strive to find new ways to improve portrait photography, as that makes up most of my actual customer base. This summer, I got into photographing classic cars and concert/music photography. Concert photography is my current point of interest, and it’s inspiring me to get more involved and experienced in it. I don’t want to limit myself to one specialty in photography—I like to have the freedom to photograph what interests me and inspires me at that particular time in my life, depending on where I am and what I see.

 

What do you love most about photography?

Freedom and creativity are my favorite parts. It allows me to be creative with the capture of time and events the way I see it through the camera, and to produce some captivating images. Photography allows me to explore various subjects. And at the end of the day, if someone purchases a print or other work, it makes it all that much more worthwhile.

 

To see Dan’s work, visit his website at www.dmwencphotography.com

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(ZenBlog) DM Wenc Photography Dan Wenc Zenfolio marketing photographer photography professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/q-a-with-summer-photo-contest-winner-dan-wenc Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Behind the Shot http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/behind-the-shot A picture is worth a thousand words, sure. But have you ever wondered what was reeling in the minds of the photographer as soon as they released the shutter? We asked several photographers to share their personal favorite shots and the stories behind them. From pulling all-nighters to capture the best lighting to traveling the corners of the globe to touching life tales of their subjects, here’s proof that there’s much more to a photo than simply pointing and shooting. Here, three seasoned photographers recount what it took to get that perfect shot.

Selfie by Gene X Hwang

“After the San Francisco Giants won the World Series in 2012, the city was abuzz with the excitement of another championship. The parade was a huge celebration, and it ended at City Hall where many dignitaries were on hand. There was a piano out front that it turns out was for Tony Bennett who sang his iconic "I Left my Heart in San Francisco" to the packed crowds. This moment happened right after he took a bow on stage. Giants reliever Sergio Romo was just as much a fan of Bennett and took a selfie onstage with the musical icon. ”

 

Three Generations by David Jordan Williams

“This triple portrait of Robbie Robertson, his son Sebastian and Sebastian's son Dylan sprang out of a portrait I had taken of Robbie with his eyes closed back in 1995 as part of a project I worked on with Robbie titled "Music For The Native Americans." The portrait became somewhat iconic for Robbie.

Recently I had his son Sebastian over to the studio for a portrait session with his son Dylan. We were shooting, and Sebastian looked at me and we almost simultaneously said "Let's try one with my eyes closed and head up." The result was a portrait that had a very similar feel to the one of Robbie. We then thought, why don't we do the same with Dylan. Well, that portrait had the same impact, and I thought it would be interesting to put the three portraits together in one image. I spent a bit of time composing and balancing the three heads and shoulders, and it just jumped off the screen. I call the piece "Three Generations." I love it.”

 

Crystal Fighters Cave Rave by Martin Hobby

“This was my first time working abroad; I was commissioned by a UK music magazine to fly to Spain and photograph Crystal Fighters play a “Rave in a Cave.” How could I refuse?

The rave took place in a village called Zugarramurdi in the Spanish Pyrenees. The journalist and I travelled out to the site with people from the band’s record label, and a couple of the DJs who were playing as well. I think I left home around 7 a.m. and after a car journey, flight, taxi and then a few hours on a coach we finally arrived at our destination in the late afternoon.

I had an AAA (Access All Areas) pass so I was allowed backstage before the show. We met and interviewed the band, and I took a few portrait shots of them against the beautiful natural cave setting. Then it was show time.

As anyone who shoots music knows, the general rule is “three songs, no flash,” and even though this event was taking place in an unusual venue that rule remained, so after the first three songs, myself and the other photographers were ushered off the rocks in front of the stage.

 

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(ZenBlog) Behind the Shot David Jordan Williams Gene X Hwang Martin Hobby Zenfolio behind the scenes commercial photography event photography galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio portrait photography professional professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/behind-the-shot Mon, 20 Oct 2014 16:00:00 GMT
Flash Sale! Save 50% on Large Prints for 24 Hours Only http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/flash-sale-save-50-on-large-prints-for-24-hours-only

Get ready to live large during our one-day flash sale. On October 21, save 50% on photographic prints sized 8x10 and larger from Mpix, MpixPro, One Vision Imaging, PhotoBox, Nulab, and NuShots.

With savings this big, now is the time to turn your images into high-quality prints that you can frame or give to loved ones.

As always, no coupon code is necessary when you order through your Zenfolio account. This sale ends October 21 at 11:59 p.m. PDT, so be sure to place your orders today.

Important Details Regarding the Sale:

•   This sale will be effective on October 21, 2014 from 12:01 a.m. PDT until 11:59 p.m. PDT only and cannot be extended to orders placed before or after this time frame.

•   This discount cannot be combined with other promotions.

•   The following vendors are participating in the promotion: Mpix, MpixPro, One Vision Imaging, PhotoBox, Nulab, and NuShots.

•   For photographers placing orders from Edit View, the promotion requires no coupon code.

•   The discount applies to base lab prices and will be reflected in the shopping cart only for orders placed from Edit View.

•   This Zenfolio promotion does not change any price lists that the photographer has created, and the discount will only be visible to photographers while logged in. Customers’ orders will not show a price discount. The discounted prices will be reflected as giving photographers a higher profit for each order.  

•   If you are looking to pass this sale on to your clients, please read our Sales FAQ.

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(ZenBlog) Mpix MpixPro Zenfolio photo photographer photography prints professional photography promotion sale selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/flash-sale-save-50-on-large-prints-for-24-hours-only Mon, 20 Oct 2014 13:00:00 GMT
Friday Foto Favorites 10.17 http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/friday-foto-favorites-10-17

 

1.     Award-winning photos of family life in Ukraine.

2.     This couple traveled to 177 countries in 26 years.

3.     Every day life, underwater.

4.     PBS on the film vs. digital debate.

5.     If you like cars, and color, check this out. 

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(ZenBlog) Friday Foto Favorites Friday Photo Favorites Zenfolio favorites galleries marketing photo photographer photography portfolio professional professional photographer professional photography selling weekly round up http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/friday-foto-favorites-10-17 Fri, 17 Oct 2014 16:00:00 GMT
7 Steps to Making a Great First Impression http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/7-steps-to-making-a-great-first-impression

Whether it’s on your website or in a directory listing, sharing information online about your photography business is crucial when it comes to putting your best foot forward. Follow the tips below to make sure you’re wowing your prospective clients and making a great first impression.

 

1.     Showcase Multiple Shoots
Prospective clients won’t get to see your range of skills if they’re only looking at pictures of the same subject against the same background with the same lighting. A wide range of variety lets a client know that their photo shoot isn’t going to be an exact replica of someone else’s and will assure them that the results of their shoot will be unique, personalized, and special. Sharing shots from multiple jobs also conveys that you’ve had more than one client. Show off your experience!

 

2.     Limit Your Genres
You might be adept at shooting in seven different categories, but someone looking through seven vastly different portfolios might get overwhelmed. If you specialize in boudoir sessions and high school senior portraits, it might get confusing looking at all of those images together. You can also consider separating each genre out into separate sections or pages so that clients can choose to only look at the ones they’re most interested in.
 

3.     Don’t Skimp on Styles
If you shoot in photojournalistic, black and white, with natural light, and more, clients benefit from seeing examples of every style. For those who aren’t aware of the differences, doing this can actually help them realize their preferences when it comes to style, and better communicate that when it’s time for a consultation.


 

4.     Highlight Your Contact Info
If someone is ready to call you and set up an appointment, they don’t want to spend more than a few minutes looking for that phone number so make sure your contact information is easy to locate.
 

5.     Bios Should Be Short and Sweet
Your bio section is a great place to show a bit of personality, but clients are going to get a better feel for who you are as an individual when they’re ready to meet you. By limiting your text, you’re also making sure that your work stays front and center.


 

6.     No Distracting Watermarks
Some photographers are adamant about including watermarks on their photos. If you’re one of them, just make sure the watermark is used in a way that doesn’t prevent people from actually seeing the work you put in to creating that image.


 

7.     Include Some, But Not All, Pricing
Starting prices can be helpful, especially to give people an idea of whether you realistically fall within their price range, but you might also be able to do custom packages that can only be priced after you better understand a specific client’s needs.

 

That first impression could make or break your next client’s decision to contact you and, ultimately, book you as their photographer. So invest some time into making sure all of your online marketing channels are in tip top shape. To boost your online presence, create a profile on Photographer Central – a directory specifically built to showcase photography businesses of every genre – and apply all of these tips to create the ultimate listing. For more information, visit www.photographercentral.com.

 

(Photo credits: Laura Tillinghast Photography, Leon Brauer Photography, Brian Bussiere PhotographyBrandon Vaccaro Studio)

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(ZenBlog) Photographer Central directory marketing photographer photography professional photographer professional photography selling http://blog.zenfolio.com/blog/2014/10/7-steps-to-making-a-great-first-impression Fri, 17 Oct 2014 02:00:00 GMT